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in Missouri you can legally ride UTVs within a three mile radius of your home. Some cities allow them as well but not all. In South Dakota they allow them any where except interstate highways. What about your state?
 

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Pretty much only places were can driive them is a designated recreational trail. Some roads also designated trails but you can't just ride them wherever.

They also have to be registered with the state and have a plate on them. Which is a joke because the don't issue you the plate they just give you what numbers you have to put on it and the specs that the plate must be made to.
 

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New York.....

You cannot register UTV's in the state. In this state an ATV is defined as being under 1000 lbs and less than 70 inches wide. You can register an ATV and ride it on the state trail systems, but UTV's typically do not fall within these limits. When the Polaris RZR first came out, there was one edition of the machine that was about 900 something pounds so it could be registered. Everything else is in the 1100 to just under 1400 lb. range and is out. I have heard of people taking the cage and dump bed off Yamaha Rhino's and getting a certified weight, and then registering them and re-installing the parts. When I had my Rhino, the lady at DMV told me she would register it if I had a certified weight slip. The DEC is on top of stuff though and will give you a ticket if they see you on the state trail systems with an overweight machine regardless of it's registration status.
There are other issues that you hear about in this state with UTV's like people getting tickets for driving them down the side of, or crossing the road. Then the person goes to court and the judge throws out the ticket cause the machines do not fit the definition of a motor vehicle in the traffic laws.
Basically as long as you have landowner permission you can drive wherever you want because without registration, the machine is technically no different than a riding lawnmower. I keep mine insured and if I have to go down the road, I have a farm triangle on a bracket that I hang on the back.
There has been a bill in the state senate for the last 4 years to bump up the weight limit so we can register, but the governor is too busy kicking state workers in the nuts, getting gay marriage legalized (no offense to any gay people ), taking away our assault weapons, and legalizing non-smokable pot.

NEW YORK STATE is a joke. If my family was not rooted here, I would move to south where the normal people still exist.

I have access to a lot of private land to ride on and that is where I use mine.
 

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in north carolina can ride on no street or highway and cannot tittle off road vehicle at all can only ride private land or ohv areas
 

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In Massachusetts there are about 60 miles of legal trails. Amazing I know. That area is about 2.5 hours away. I do not register my sxs because basically there is no legal riding in my area and the money generated by the atv registration does not go torward anything atv related. So I buy my utv’s in tax free New Hampshire, do not register them in Massachusetts, and ride most Friday nights under the cover of darkness illegally. I’ve encountered three police officers over the years. Two were nice and just happy I stopped and talked with them. The third was a pissed off state trooper and he ended getting left behind in the dust. I register my sxs in Maine and spend my money up there riding their 6,000 plus miles of trails and patronizing their restaurants and sporting camps.

Jim
 
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Ohio- Less then fifty miles of less than 62" trails, one open area. No road use and no official UTV registration but you must register as ATV for state land.
 

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I don’t know about all of Michigan, but in the upper peninsula where I am you can basically ride on all state land. And there a lot of it. And there’s an ordinance in my town that we can drive on the shoulder of most roads. Not the US highway that runs through the town but we can go across to get to a trail or gas station. Reading the previous posts makes me feel very lucky.


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ohio has a few areas that allow utvs on the road. have some friends that live near killbuck and they are able to ride rt into town for food and gas and things like that. Where I live however is strictly farm use and you better be able to prove it...
 

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Here in Utah, with some minor modification and insurance you can go pretty much anywhere under 50 mph. Just need to keep clear of interstates, corridors and highways.
 

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ohio has a few areas that allow utvs on the road. have some friends that live near killbuck and they are able to ride rt into town for food and gas and things like that. Where I live however is strictly farm use and you better be able to prove it...
Ya, it is up to the county. I have not got any of the counties I ride in to put in writing anything. One day you'll get of wave and next day lights. The actual state law's aren't real prohibitive.
 

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NEVADA.....WFO...minimal BLM interference...a few quote "wilderness areas" that are closed to vehicle traffic....but area wise they are insignificant compared to the open lands.....

Other than that only private property (95% of that is accessible if you mind you manners) and the state parks are governed....

YEAH....and NO helmets required except in state parks....why go there in the first place??

With the correct OHV sticker and $60 a year insurance and no requirement for street legal accessories...you can ride on almost any pavement except for state major highways and interstates....even at that the regs allow 2-3 miles of parallel operation in the shoulders in order to cross over....

Don't pass this on.....
 

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Kommiefornia-- street legal ATV's or UTV's?? Fogedaboutit. Thats a big ol' NOPE on paved roads, even with our lets-save-the-planet "green sticker/red sticker" registration scam. Stay on the designated trails or in designated off-road areas only, and those areas are shrinking and disappearing by the day.
 

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Kommiefornia-- street legal ATV's or UTV's?? Fogedaboutit. Thats a big ol' NOPE on paved roads, even with our lets-save-the-planet "green sticker/red sticker" registration scam. Stay on the designated trails or in designated off-road areas only, and those areas are shrinking and disappearing by the day.
Agree -and having said all that, I find that enforcement is pretty nil. In 11 years of riding in NFs, I have yet to meet any USFS people on the roads. The big push with "designated routes" has died down, the signage that went up immediately during that period has fallen into disrepair - any many roads never got the signage and certainly don't get the maintenance. There's no money - even the logging doesn't get much oversight out in the field, from what I can tell. Dirt county roads are a mix - some have been signed as street legal only, usually in response to OHVs being a nuisance with high speed craziness. Others have nothing and I usually get a wave from county sheriffs, Fish and Game, etc. The exclusion focus on OHV is changing to over-the-snow vehicles now. Distractions abound in California, it's always the problem of the day that gets the attention.

I've noticed the difference between this and other states - here, you're pretty much on the defensive with signs about what you can't do. Over in Utah, I saw a sign that said "Welcome to YOUR National Forest", with directions to places you could go and see and where you could use OHV etc.
 

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In Maine, many towns are becoming more atv friendly by having designated access routes to hotels, gas and restaurants. I personally think it's the best compromise to have in terms of not being street legal. I've eaten at some great places as a result that I would never have visited otherwise. Now if only the Maine Snowmobile Association and ATV Maine would work together, imagine the possibilities.


http://www.gpstrailmasters.com/content/goomap/atv-map_E.html
 

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Idaho

No state highways or interstates. Can only cross state highways. County roads are open to ATVs and UTVs with a recreational vehicle license plate. Cities are open for all with the recreational vehicle license plate unless the city code specifically says no ATV/UTV on streets.

Forest lands (USFS, State and private) are a mixed bag, but generally restricted to 50 inch width.

A motorcycle endorsement is not required.
 
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Idaho

Idaho's ATV, then OHV (includes UTV's under 72" wide), and ORV laws came about by amending our snowmobile laws. Remember the 2-stroke smoking and screaming snowmobiles? The Noise regulations (96dB) were the basis of Idaho's OHV and ORV laws. Other than noise and licensing (the State hits new residents and new & used OHVs with a 6% sales tax), Idaho's laws concerning trails incorporates the US Motor Vehicle Use Maps along with the Idaho State Lands Trails maps. I have learned that 50" trails are rare (I have only ever seen one 50" width trail in 23 years of riding ATVs and UTVs). The maps verify this low frequency.
On July 1st, 2018, a major problem for OHV riding arose. Trespassing laws were strengthened and posting laws were relaxed. I used to occasionally hunt on Potlatch Lumber land. 100,000s of acres of this land has been bought by a Texas company, and all the land it acquired is now off limits.
Thank goodness for USDA, USFS, BLM, and Idaho State public lands, and it's many roads and trails that are open to UTVs.
 

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WA (somewhat complicated, but allowed and growing)

State law and licensing, but up to each county and city to adopt.
Roads: <= 35mph posted speed limits only.
Equipment: Mirrors, turn signals, horn.
USFS Roads: No*.

Details:
State passed a "wheeled all terrain vehicle" law a few years back, allowing legal/licensed UTVs and ATVs on roads with speed limits 35 and under.
You get a "restricted" license plate (and a new/reissued branded title) for the UTV once a dealer has inspected it to ensure it meets street-legal requirements (horn, mirrors, turn signals). That license plate has spots for both on-road and off-road tabs that you renew each year.

Counties under a certain population are automatically included in the state law. All other counties have to specifically adopt the ordinance in accordance w/ state law. In addition, even cities within those counties must specifically approve. Most of the rural counties and many of the smaller cities have adopted it.

USFS: USFS roads are open to all highway legal vehicles only. Since WA issues a "restricted" license plate, the Forest Service interprets that as them not being highway legal. Semantics...
 
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