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I just did the pita first service on my x2 xt-r. Boy, the gen 1 was easier. Regardless, while I was in the middle of the work, thought I’d double check my 2019 svc manual (I don’t have the 2020 manual). I noticed a discrepancy between the required gear oil for the transmission compared to the diffs.

From the manual for the trans: TypeYamaha Friction Modified Plus Shaft Drive Oil (Part No.: ACC-SHAFT-PL-32).

For the differentials: Yamaha Friction Modified Plus Shaft Drive Oil (Part No.: ACCSHAFT-PL-32) or SAE 80 API GL-4 Hypoid gear oil.

I used Klotz atv/utv synthetic sae 80-90 hypoid gear oil gl-5 in both diffs and trans. I can’t tell if its friction modified or not. Quick function test didn’t show any problems in the trans.

Question: Was it ok for me to use the same gear oil in the trans and diffs? I had the Klotz gear oil left over from my gen 1 (not needed for the trans in gen 1‘s, just diffs).
 

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All I can tell you is I've run Mobil 1 75W90 in all 3 for 11K miles and my transmission shifts between 2/4WD effortlessly. Gear Butter was added to all 3 at about the 3K mile mark.
Thanks Massive. The thing that hung me up was that it seemed like the transmission absolutely had to have friction modifier in the oil, where the diffs not necessarily. Unless the "hypoid" part of the description means friction modifier. Usually, like on my jeeps, the gear lube specifically says with friction modifier. Mobile1 says "works with limited slip differentials", where I can't get any of that info on the Klotz website. I think I'm Ok, since it's an OEM substitute for the Polaris AGM fluid, which is friction modified. I guess I'll find out when I take it for a long drive.
 

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Thanks Massive. The thing that hung me up was that it seemed like the transmission absolutely had to have friction modifier in the oil, where the diffs not necessarily. Unless the "hypoid" part of the description means friction modifier. Usually, like on my jeeps, the gear lube specifically says with friction modifier. Mobile1 says "works with limited slip differentials", where I can't get any of that info on the Klotz website. I think I'm Ok, since it's an OEM substitute for the Polaris AGM fluid, which is friction modified. I guess I'll find out when I take it for a long drive.
I'm looking at the shop manual of the transmission components and I can't see anything that would require friction modifiers. I could be wrong though.
 

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Hypoid is the gear cut. Think of tapered ends and how they mesh together to reduce noise.
Gear oil has a higher viscosity compared to engine oil and usually recommended for temperature operation.
Many hypoid gear oils have additive packages for specific needs/requirements.
Most additive packages claim to extend wear/scoring of gears and bearings under heavy loads.

From the Yamalube Friction-Modified Plus.

""This new Plus formula is a superior lubricant-ready for the next generation differentials,
both wet clutch/brake and standard types, as well as today's shaft drive systems.
Far exceeding typical differential oils, it is specially formulated for extended noise-free and vibration-free clutch/brake operation.
Contains exceptional anti-wear and anti-scoring performance additives to protect gear teeth and bearings,
even against the rigors of tough running over adverse terrain.
It's dispersant inhibitor package helps maintain the pliable nature of seals, preventing leaks.
For use in land product differentials which specify API GL-4 or GL-5 gear oil.""

I have never used a GL-5 product.
Differences of GL-4 & GL-5
https://www.rymax-lubricants.com/blog/the-differences-between-gl-4-and-gl-5/

I have used this Yamalube in my machine and have changed fluids 4 times in 2,700 miles.
I don't have any issues with noise or vibration. Very important to note.
To be honest, I thought about switching to my prefered oils for the Trans & Diffs, but I'm really impressed with this gear oil so far.
I don't hear any gear whine noise or feel any vibrations.

With all that said, as a traveling Millwright, I've repaired and serviced many of the same gearboxes in many different Plants.
Many have a Quantitative & Qualitative Department.
They keep a life history log on all machinery and equipment,
i.e. Oil sampling analysis, vibration analysis, all maintenance logs, alignment records, etc.

Some of these Plants all use the same type of recommended oils and some don't.
The ones that don't have certain oils with additive packages and claim that their history data/analysis shows a longer life and/or less wear of gears/bearings/seals.

Even though some Plants with the same gearboxes/machinery use different oils, they all agree on one thing.
Use the proper type of fluids and change/service them regularly according to schedules that they have developed from their analysis.

Pics, gotta have pics....lol.
From the Service Manual....
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oil 1.jpg
.

oil 2.jpg
.

oil 3.jpg
 
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I've looked at all the diagrams before I added Gear Butter. I figured it would help with the gear dogs engagement.
I don't see anything in the Transmission that would require a LS additive like a clutch pack.

Now the front Diff is a different story as it has a clutch pack if I recall. I'll have to look again.

Most clutch packs require a additive.

I changed rear ends in my work truck. The new rear required a LS additive.
Long story short, I was in a rush and forgot to add the LS additive.
It lasted about 2 weeks before it blew apart. I knew immediately that I forgot to add it.
Thank god it was 4x4 as I just locked in the front and drove it home....lol.
 

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Some GL5 I have read have too much additive corrosive to either copper or brass used in some diffs where as GL4 does not. I read Royal Purple was the only GL4 and GL5 compatible gear oil. While the Mobile had the corrosion as the negative if an issue. Hence it all depends and merely looking at the SAE GLx is not enough. oh why why not. At least the owners manual did say GL5 could be used. LOL
 

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Thank for the LIKES Shelly much appreciated. Almost there now.... might click over before the night is out.

I had my dinner and on some nice Wine now mellowing. My Gen 1 is in the the Engine oil TSB rebuild and also a full CVT service of the two sheaves. I'll get feedback as to how their condition was to gauge when and what I need down the road after this is done.

Figure's crossed..
 
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Planetcat main challenge I see, is that you went off the 2019 manual for a 2020, and they could be different and did not see anyone offer a thought on that. Maybe worth checking.
I did some research a while ago on the GL5 vs GL4 and IIRC there is no concerns unless there is brass involved. And diffs not an issue and not sure about the X machines. If you used the different fluids specifically from what the 2020 manual shows and you have a warranty claim I would not mention the gear oil difference. If someone were to do a spectronalysis (however it's spelled) they could probably tell difference and deny a claim. But not likely.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've checked for years about the diff lock and front diff locking mechanism in my Big Bear 400 atv and two wolverines and I'm pretty sure they are using gear-driven LSD's in the front, like a detroit true-trac and the rear AAM differential in my Ram 2500 truck. I've had true trac's in 4 jeeps and think the world of them for a well mannered traction device. I'm pretty sure the Yamaha's are similar as far as I can tell from this picture from the 2019 wolverine service manual with the exception of the electronic actuator to fully lock it. This would imply that there is no need for friction modifier in the front (and of course rear) diffs. This to me is what makes Yamaha's 4wd system so much better than the other makes: Kawi uses clutches for diff lock, Can-am has that crappy visco-lok, and Polaris has some sort of limited slip too.

YamahaFrontDiffDiagram.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Planetcat main challenge I see, is that you went off the 2019 manual for a 2020, and they could be different and did not see anyone offer a thought on that. Maybe worth checking.
I did some research a while ago on the GL5 vs GL4 and IIRC there is no concerns unless there is brass involved. And diffs not an issue and not sure about the X machines. If you used the different fluids specifically from what the 2020 manual shows and you have a warranty claim I would not mention the gear oil difference. If someone were to do a spectronalysis (however it's spelled) they could probably tell difference and deny a claim. But not likely.
Thanks and I agree that I need a 2020 manual. The only bummer about the warranty is that the Klotz gear lube is red in color, and I think the Yamalube is clearish. I have to say that I was very surprised that all my fluids were very dirty after the 20 hrs/150 miles. I don't have an extended warranty anyways, but I did use Yamalube semi-synthetic in the engine, so I could apply for my 100,000 mile warranty on it, LOL.
 

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I just did the pita first service on my x2 xt-r. Boy, the gen 1 was easier. Regardless, while I was in the middle of the work, thought I’d double check my 2019 svc manual (I don’t have the 2020 manual). I noticed a discrepancy between the required gear oil for the transmission compared to the diffs.

From the manual for the trans: TypeYamaha Friction Modified Plus Shaft Drive Oil (Part No.: ACC-SHAFT-PL-32).

For the differentials: Yamaha Friction Modified Plus Shaft Drive Oil (Part No.: ACCSHAFT-PL-32) or SAE 80 API GL-4 Hypoid gear oil.

I used Klotz atv/utv synthetic sae 80-90 hypoid gear oil gl-5 in both diffs and trans. I can’t tell if its friction modified or not. Quick function test didn’t show any problems in the trans.

Question: Was it ok for me to use the same gear oil in the trans and diffs? I had the Klotz gear oil left over from my gen 1 (not needed for the trans in gen 1‘s, just diffs).
Thanks for kicking me over the big 1000

Cheers, and yeah a lot more to just looking that its GL5 apparently in making a selection.
 

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Woot!
Planetcat busted Tripplec 1K cherry :p
Congrats T :D
 
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Thanks and I agree that I need a 2020 manual. The only bummer about the warranty is that the Klotz gear lube is red in color, and I think the Yamalube is clearish. I have to say that I was very surprised that all my fluids were very dirty after the 20 hrs/150 miles. I don't have an extended warranty anyways, but I did use Yamalube semi-synthetic in the engine, so I could apply for my 100,000 mile warranty on it, LOL.
Your Trans and Drives fluids were dirty?
Mine have been like new since day one that I can remember.

I did notice a Big difference once I changed the brake-in fluids.
Everything just felt smoother from the engine to front and final drives.
4W drive engaged in & out better too.
 

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I have to say that I was very surprised that all my fluids were very dirty after the 20 hrs/150 miles.
Check your breather tubes. and seals.
 

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Yeah I went digging into the manual. Maybe I was thinking about when I helped my buddy rebuild his front diff in his Yamaha ATV.
I forget what year it was, but it had a clutch pack for 4 wheel drive but diff lock engagement was different.

They don't show it in that pic, but the servo motor operates a shift fork.
It spins one direction for 4 wheel drive and the opposite direction for diff lock IIRC
Or half way for one mode and all the way for the other mode.

Edit: Loved my older jeeps quadratec vac lock and even my 99' select-trac was impressive. I don't know about the newer models systems though.

I've checked for years about the diff lock and front diff locking mechanism in my Big Bear 400 atv and two wolverines and I'm pretty sure they are using gear-driven LSD's in the front, like a detroit true-trac and the rear AAM differential in my Ram 2500 truck. I've had true trac's in 4 jeeps and think the world of them for a well mannered traction device. I'm pretty sure the Yamaha's are similar as far as I can tell from this picture from the 2019 wolverine service manual with the exception of the electronic actuator to fully lock it. This would imply that there is no need for friction modifier in the front (and of course rear) diffs. This to me is what makes Yamaha's 4wd system so much better than the other makes: Kawi uses clutches for diff lock, Can-am has that crappy visco-lok, and Polaris has some sort of limited slip too.

View attachment 86612
 

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I wanted to make sure I wasn't loosing my mind with the clutch pack, I went searching.
In a 2017 Yamaha video they show clutch packs.
.
 

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When I added Gear Butter, I tested 4 wheel drive on blacktop road.
I was going to add my results in when I update the 'Butter' thread, but 4 wheel drive felt smoother with less driving/steering resistance.
It felt so good that I forgot it was in 4 wheel drive and drove for miles until I noticed it.

Link to Gear Butter...
https://www.hunterworks.com/inc/sdetail/123661/139007
 

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I figured this was why some on FB complain that one wheel takes more effort to spin by hand vs the other side.
I don't argue with most of those dudes, it's hard enough explaining how to change fluids....lol

Edit: Adding Pic from service manual.
3.7 - 15 ft lbs is in spec.
.
FrontDifCheck.jpg
 
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