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If it drives straight and the sterring wheel is off, then reclock the steering wheel. If it pulls one way or the other and the steering wheel is off, than adjust the tierods for alignment.
 

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They have a way to know to mount the wheel. Usually it is a mark on the end of the shaft.
The tie rod adjustment having the wheel straight when machine is traveling straight doesn't have a way to mark that and takes a little more doing and it isn't getting done,.

If it drives straight and the sterring wheel is off, then reclock the steering wheel. If it pulls one way or the other and the steering wheel is off, than adjust the tierods for alignment.
No correlation whatsoever to a machine that is pulling and one that just has the wheeel out of center.

Common sense says you take a machine with perfect alignment of tie rods and wheel centering and go move one side shorter and one side longer by the same amount of turns and the alignment is EXACTLY as it was and can be perfect in everyway EXCEPT the wheel is not centered anymore.

The problem is the same here. It is absolutely the tie rods not the wheel. The tie rods are easier to do than the wheel besides.
 

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Maybe, maybe not. My Rhino has more spins to the left than it did to the right, meaning it wasn't centered on the rack. I reclocked it to get directly in the center, than realigned via tie rods. Then I had full lock to lock operation with the steering wheel spinning equal amounts either way. Sometimes the people at the factory don't get it right.
 

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Alignment of the machine is one of the last steps of the assembly line process. The steering wheel is put on long before that. Trust me, if the machine tracks straight on it's own without driver input and the steering wheel is clocked wrong, the steering wheel needs moved. If you go monkeying around with tie rod ends you nor your tires will be happy. Tie rods, ball joints and bushing work is for Polaris owners.
 

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Well I’ll just say this. Mine was off center. I moved it one tooth and then it was off center the same amount the other direction so I moved it back. I drove it like that for 2.5 years. No funny tire wear with 3 different sets of tires and it drove straight.
I finally decided to center the wheel and align it. Once I got down to string lines and pulling measurements off the frame etc I found the alignment wasn’t in spec and one side was toed in much more than the other. The moral of my story is, just because it drives strait and it doesn’t have bad tire wear doesn’t mean it’s right and if you go about doing your own alignment intelligently you won’t be sorry either! A home version alignment for one of these can be pulled off by various methods and is nothing anyone should be afraid of!
 

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long story short. Budro is what I was trying to get at but couldn't get it into words properly. Follow his advice.
 

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So, no funny tire wear and drove straight through 3 sets of tires.........alignment out of spec????

I'm just trying to figure the logic on circumventing a simple move of a steering wheel. I've owned 2 Rhinos and a first gen Wolverine and now an RMAX. Re clocked the steering wheel on all 4 and never had an issue.
 

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I don't think anyone is saying that is the wrong way to do it if it works for you except maybe one or two. I'd move the wheel too. Maybe I'm missing something others are saying.
 

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The logic is that toe should be checked to be in spec before moving the wheel, just like you would on a car. It's pretty easy to get it close with a string and a tape. If the tie rods are out of whack (they were on all three of my machines) and you move the wheel, chances are it will turn farther one way than the other. If this doesn't bother you, have at it, move the wheel.

Once you get the wheel straight and the tie rods close to equal, you can play with toe and see what feels best.
 

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If it drives straight and the sterring wheel is off, then reclock the steering wheel. If it pulls one way or the other and the steering wheel is off, than adjust the tierods for alignment.
I don't think anyone is saying that is the wrong way to do it if it works for you except maybe one or two. I'd move the wheel too. Maybe I'm missing something others are saying.
The steering wheel is centered on the rack. It turns the same amount in each direction from that center. So you leave it centered on the rack and set the wheels so it drives straight ahead. The wheel wants to stay centered on the rack for sure. As mentioned reclocking the wheel probably isn't going to be straight either so you still will need to fix the tie rods.

Driving straight doesn't mean jack about tie rods being correct. If the wheel is crooked it isn't because they didn't center the wheel on the rack but rather the wheels were not adjusted to drive car straight when wheel is straight. You need fine incremental adjustments the tie rods provide that a entire spline on the wheel can not.
 

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Then how come my Rhino took more turns lock to lock one way and not the other with wheels off and the front end in the air going of from where the steering wheel was centered. It had to be off a tooth or two otherwise starting with the steering wheel centered, it would take the same amount of turns both ways. But it didn't. Orginally it was where the white mark was on the steering wheel and shaft. Moving it a tooth of two ( I can't remember as that was years ago) gave me the same lock to lock turn ratio with the steering wheel perfectly centered. Front end in the air and no wheels on. After that, I adjusted the tie rods with both being close, maybe one side had a thread or two more. Then is drove perfectly with even tread wear. I'm sorry but they don't get always get these thing perfect from the factory, Maybe your haven't had these issues but it happends
 

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In other words my Rhino was not centered on the rack if it it took more turns one way to lock than the other. It happens.
 

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The truth of the matter is that it’s entirely possible that the wheel is not clocked right from factory and that alignment is not right from factory. Both should be checked. I think the points every one has made are correct. I think it’s highly more likely that the tie rods are not adjusted properly than that the wheel is not clocked right. The cases documented of bad alignment on this forum alone tell us that they don’t put a lot of merit on it from factory, and that it is just overlooked by most dealerships! I don’t think people should be intimidated by adjusting the tie rods and alignment as if it’s taboo. I also don’t think that if someone moves the wheel a tooth that it’s going to be the end of the world. I also think that unless people are driving on asphalt a lot and at higher speeds that they are not going to feel the effects of an improper alignment and they are not going see dramatic improper tire wear like we would in a regular vehicle. Just look at the broad range allowed for the proper toe in in the owners manual. That is not going to fly on our daily drivers. We are driving on loose footing for the most part. If we tried to do this kind of an alignment on our own in our regular vehicles we’d all have funny driving vehicles and bad tire wear. This is why mine drove pretty well with nothing dramatically noticeable even though it wasn’t right, and it’s why we all get by with doing a simple home version alignment and it works. People who race UTV s tend to take it to the next step and get a professional alignment but for those of us moving at the speeds we trail ride in a sport utility vehicle we can get away with many variables. Some people even prefer slightly toed out. Imagine trying to get away with that on your highway vehicle!
Playing with your tie rods isn’t rocket science on the buggy’s! Watch a few videos, read a few threads, get out a wrench and go for it!
 

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Then how come my Rhino took more turns lock to lock one way and not the other with wheels off and the front end in the air going of from where the steering wheel was centered. It had to be off a tooth or two otherwise starting with the steering wheel centered, it would take the same amount of turns both ways. But it didn't. Orginally it was where the white mark was on the steering wheel and shaft. Moving it a tooth of two ( I can't remember as that was years ago) gave me the same lock to lock turn ratio with the steering wheel perfectly centered. Front end in the air and no wheels on. After that, I adjusted the tie rods with both being close, maybe one side had a thread or two more. Then is drove perfectly with even tread wear. I'm sorry but they don't get always get these thing perfect from the factory, Maybe your haven't had these issues but it happends
I am saying the same thing. You are agreeing that the wheel must be centered on the rack. Do you think it is that simple that they simply missed center on them. Possible. But if they are centered then the tie rods need fixing not the wheel.
I just don't think that is going to be the case. Why sure if in fact they aren't centered but check that first before you move a wheel that might already be centered and shouldn't be moved to fix the issue IMO.
.
 

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Sometimes things aren't as clear to me when reading. Getting worse as I get older. I told you all I'm getting dumber working for the government in the "What's Everyones Profession" thread. That's why I like to pick up the phone at work and skip the email.
 

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I centered my steering wheel yesterday after work. I’m by no means an authority on this. I’ve only done it one other time but thought I’d talk about the method I used to show others who my be hesitant about it just how simple and easy it can be. On the 2016 machine, I put a lot more effort into laying out a square around the whole machine and checking the rear wheels in relation to the frame and aligning the the front off of that. This Machine drove straight just like the last one with the wheel about at the 1 o’clock position.
First thing I did was check the toe in which was 3/8”. I’m not sure what the spec is but on the 2016 it was listed as a very broad range, telling me that it’s personal preference, not rocket science. I believe when I watched the Shock Therapy video about all this, they said they like an 1/8” toed in.
Next I backed the lock nuts off all the way on the tie rod till they stopped.
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Notice the gap on one side is much larger than the other, meaning more or less adjustment has been used up off the center of the tie rod one side to the other. This was a red flag to me that maybe the wheel was not clocked right. I turned the wheel all the way one way and the other and there was a slight difference but it was so minuscule that moving the wheel a tooth would only make it worse. The wheel makes one full revolution each way! I pulled the center cap In the wheel and there was no kind of mark or reference indexing the wheel placement. I assume it is centered on the rack and moved on with alignment.
01AAF448-80AF-4294-8BBE-8FB49753D84C.jpeg

I then centered the wheel and pulled measurements off the frame next to the plastic to the center rib on the tire. There was about a 1/4” difference.
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I grabbed a 6’ long straight edge and held it against the front tire while sighting down it and one side pointed right at the outer edge of the rear tire and the other pointed at the inside edge of the outer lug on the rear tire. All of this confirming that with the wheel centered my tires were not pointed straight ahead.
I marked the top of the tie rod with an ink pen to use as a reference as the starting point. My goal initially was to move both tires in the same direction till the measurement off the frame was the same and test drive it. Then I was going to change the toe in to be a little less. I moved both rods a 1/4 turn in the desired direction ended up with the same thing I had before only the other way. I moved them back an 1/8 and locked it down and checked it. I will say in adjusting, the whole tie rod end will pivot back and forth so you can easily think your making an adjustment when your not. This must be where I went wrong because I ended up now having 3/4” toe in. My initial thoughts based on how my 2016 was, were correct on this Rmax as well. I wanted to have 3/16 to an 1/8 toe in when done. This was really a matter of just one wheel being turned in to much. After looking down the straight edge again one tire was still pointed down the side of the rear tire and the other was pointed into the tread on the rear tire. I pulled a measurement off the frame of the one that lined up and then moved the one out of whack to be the same. I looked down the straight edge and had the same picture on both sides, lining up with the outer rear tire. I checked the toe and had 3/16”. Locked it all down and took it for a drive. The wheel stayed exactly centered. I did a little loop down a gravel road to a canal road that brought me out to the oiled county road and hit 63 miles per hour and let go of the wheel. It drove straight, no pulling at all.

I’m sure others with more experience in the matter will have thoughts to add and please do! We’ve already got more in depth alignment threads but my goal was to let readers know this is not something to be afraid of. It really is a simple task that is suitable for the terrain and speeds we drive! The percentage of these from factory that are not right is very high. Don’t accept it, just take care of it like you do a rattling tailgate etc.

I will also add once again that this machine drove straight before fixing it, just like my 2016 did. They both had the same problem. Just one side toed in to much. If you just measure the toe in and it’s within the broad range spec that they give, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s right. I will also say like I previously posted, I wore out a full set of tires on the 2016 and used up half the tread on two other sets of tires before adjusting it and I could never tell that unusual tire wear was at play. This may not be a professional alignment but I have no doubt that it’s better off than it was! It still drives right, the wheel is centered and if I didn’t get bad tire wear when it was out of whack on the earlier model I’m surely not going to get it now that it’s more correct!
 

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Good info Budro. I'm going to put my SuperATV ball joints in before I even attempt looking at the alignment on the RMAX. I'd probably get it where I liked it and then have to do it all over again after the ball joints. Nothing wrong with the OEM ball joints but the SuperATVs are badass. I'm going to keep the OEMS as spares but doubt I'll ever need them. If I break the SuperATVs, then something else is going to break too.
 

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I used to be an alignment guy.

Back when I used to do car alignments for a living, we had a machine that had these hubs that attached to the wheels. Once these hubs were installed onto each rim, we then had to rotate the wheels and the machine would (mechanically at first, then digitally a few years later) figure out the "runout" of the wheel, which would then allow us to continue with the alignment. You can't make accurate adjustments on a crooked wheel/tire, but since all wheels/tires are a little crooked (runout), you have to find the true center. Caster and Camber were always done first, then the Toe-in/out was the last adjustment. We really don't have caster and camber adjustments on these machines. If one of those adjustments is needed, that means something is bent. (And bending back or replacement would be the only way to adjust it also). Really, on these machines, the TOE is the only alignment adjustment that we can make.

Light 4x4 solid axle trucks were always difficult as the hubs usually wouldn't fit the wheels and back in the day most solid front axle trucks didn't have Caster and Camber adjustments anyway...so in some cases, we would just adjust the toe. We found out that we couldn't always depend on that center rib of the tire (or the same place on the lugs around the tire) really being the center (or the same, is all that mattered) all the way around the tire so a little trick that we would do is to jack up the wheel/tire, then rotate/spin it while having someone holding a piece of chalk or even a metal scribe at the center of the tire, making a TRUE center line all the way around the tire to make your adjustments from. It doesn't even have to be in the center, it's just a line all the way around the tire that is in the same place. It surprised me how often the built in rib of the tire was not the same all the way around most of the time. Your temporary chalk or scribe line IS in fact the same all the way around and is very reliable to make your 1/16" and 1/8" toe adjustments from. All wheels and tires have some runout. Some are very minimal (1/16" or even less sometimes) but I've seen wheels/tires have almost 1/2" of runout sometimes.

And just because your steering wheel is straight and that your machine doesn't pull one way or the other, doesn't mean it's aligned correctly. The toe can be extremely OUT or extremely IN and the machine will still track straight (most of the time). It will wear the tires quickly, or it might dart one way or the other (wander) but it will track straight. If you are noticing abnormal tire wear (cupping/scalloping/wearing) but your machine seems to track straight and the steering wheel is even straight...you could need your toe (alignment) adjusted. And as mentioned, spring preload, lift kits, even load will affect the alignment and toe. The best you can do is adjust your suspension, install your lift kit, load it up like it's going to be in real life (we would put exercise weights in the front seat of a car to mimic a person driving it), and then do your best alignment..which means you have to compensate for the runout. You can't depend on the wheels/tires being straight. They aren't.

Finally...the steering wheel...to check and see if it's installed correctly: Jack it up. Turn it from lock to lock. Mark it and count the turns, etc. then find the center. If the wheel is not straight, it's installed wrong. Remove it and center it. Drive it and see where it is when you are driving it now. If it's not straight...you need to adjust your tie rod ends. As mentioned in many posts above, adjust it the same IN on one side and the same OUT on the other side. Your alignment will stay good (assuming it was good to start with) but you can center the wheel this way. If you run out of adjustment before the wheel is centered...something is broken, bent or worn out. (which, by the way, should all be checked BEFORE you do an alignment anyway...).

Hope some of this helps!
 
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Finally...the steering wheel...to check and see if it's installed correctly: Jack it up. Turn it from lock to lock. Mark it and count the turns, etc. then find the center. If the wheel is not straight, it's installed wrong. Remove it and center it. Drive it and see where it is when you are driving it now. If it's not straight...you need to adjust your tie rod ends. As mentioned in many posts above, adjust it the same IN on one side and the same OUT on the other side. Your alignment will stay good (assuming it was good to start with) but you can center the wheel this way. If you run out of adjustment before the wheel is centered...something is broken, bent or worn out. (which, by the way, should all be checked BEFORE you do an alignment anyway...).

Hope some of this helps!
That will not tell you if rack is centered as you are going off the bump stops. You really want to start by getting it centered on the racks travel first. Then just center on the rack and get the car toe in set so it is correct while the car drives straight ahead with the wheel straight and ignore where the steering wheel ends at the bump stops entirely.
 
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