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who knows how to adjust these shocks and what not.....first time having a machine with shocks to adjust like this most have been simple atv shocks with 5 notches or shocks with no adjustments at all, these look like spanish to me lol
 

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the owners manual will help you out. i have not played with them yet.
 

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Posted this before but here it is again.

The top screw NUT on the shock is High speed compression. Turning clockwise will harden the compression. Makes the wheel come up slower when hitting big bumps. An example for this is landing from a jump or hitting a rock. You'll feel more on normal bumps but less chance to bottom out on big ones.

The screw inside the High speed compression nut is low speed compression.. The low speed compression adjuster affects ride height, smoothness over small bumps and grip. Also, it's when the wheel moves up and down slow like a series of wide whoops or the action from the G force in the turn. IE.. going through a dip or sandy conditions will move the suspension in and out slowly.

Bottom is rebound.. Moving this clockwise makes the wheel release slower after being compressed. Will keep it from bucking you up.. but needs to be fast enough to stay on the ground to keep you in control. If it feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy then the rebound damping should be increased Also, if it doesn't go back down fast enough it can pump down over a whoop section. Saw a video with a razor hitting some whoop section and it ended up flipping over forward. That's because the rear shocks were not letting the tire go down fast enough to soak up the next bump. So the shock travel was getting shallower and shallower basically it had no shock after the 4th bump. Then boom it kicks on over.

That's pretty basic but a start.
 

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The top screw nut on the shock is high speed compression. Turning clockwise will harden the compression.
The only adjustment I have made on mine so far (400 miles) is the high speed compression on the fronts.
I was bottoming the shocks on fast (35 mph+) runs on hard pack trails.

I do have an inch or two of spring sag so I am hitting large rocks I was clearing when the machine was new.
 

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Posted this before but here it is again.

The top screw NUT on the shock is High speed compression. Turning clockwise will harden the compression. Makes the wheel come up slower when hitting big bumps. An example for this is landing from a jump or hitting a rock. You'll feel more on normal bumps but less chance to bottom out on big ones.

The screw inside the High speed compression nut is low speed compression.. The low speed compression adjuster affects ride height, smoothness over small bumps and grip. Also, it's when the wheel moves up and down slow like a series of wide whoops or the action from the G force in the turn. IE.. going through a dip or sandy conditions will move the suspension in and out slowly.

Bottom is rebound.. Moving this clockwise makes the wheel release slower after being compressed. Will keep it from bucking you up.. but needs to be fast enough to stay on the ground to keep you in control. If it feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy then the rebound damping should be increased Also, if it doesn't go back down fast enough it can pump down over a whoop section. Saw a video with a razor hitting some whoop section and it ended up flipping over forward. That's because the rear shocks were not letting the tire go down fast enough to soak up the next bump. So the shock travel was getting shallower and shallower basically it had no shock after the 4th bump. Then boom it kicks on over.

That's pretty basic but a start.
I do mostly trail riding/mud park rides and lots of use at the deer lease. My back tires rub with weight in the bed what screw on the back shocks would i want to adjust to fix this problem
 

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I do mostly trail riding/mud park rides and lots of use at the deer lease. My back tires rub with weight in the bed what screw on the back shocks would i want to adjust to fix this problem
That would need more preload to counter the weight I believe. That's the big threaded adjustment on top of the spring.
 
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Posted this before but here it is again.

The top screw NUT on the shock is High speed compression. Turning clockwise will harden the compression. Makes the wheel come up slower when hitting big bumps. An example for this is landing from a jump or hitting a rock. You'll feel more on normal bumps but less chance to bottom out on big ones.

The screw inside the High speed compression nut is low speed compression.. The low speed compression adjuster affects ride height, smoothness over small bumps and grip. Also, it's when the wheel moves up and down slow like a series of wide whoops or the action from the G force in the turn. IE.. going through a dip or sandy conditions will move the suspension in and out slowly.

Bottom is rebound.. Moving this clockwise makes the wheel release slower after being compressed. Will keep it from bucking you up.. but needs to be fast enough to stay on the ground to keep you in control. If it feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy then the rebound damping should be increased Also, if it doesn't go back down fast enough it can pump down over a whoop section. Saw a video with a razor hitting some whoop section and it ended up flipping over forward. That's because the rear shocks were not letting the tire go down fast enough to soak up the next bump. So the shock travel was getting shallower and shallower basically it had no shock after the 4th bump. Then boom it kicks on over.

That's pretty basic but a start.
Very nice explanation of what everything does. I had to play with all my settings to get mine to ride smooth and comfortable like I like. It appears you have quite a bit of knowledge concerning these things. So I have a couple questions for you.

I have my rebound setting pretty much full soft, high speed compression is all the way soft and the low speed compression is also pretty much full soft. My problem is, on larger rocks going slow mind you I tend to bottom out sometimes.

From your good explanation above, what do I need to do to stop it from bottoming out? I'm thinking maybe I need to set the high speed compression back a little harder, your thoughts?

You also mentioned low speed compression can affect ride height, I was not aware it did that, do you know how it does it and would you suggest also in bringing it back a little harder to assist with giving me potentially a little more clearance and less chance of bottoming out on the rocks.

Any information that you can give me, and a simple explanation will not bother me, would be greatly appreciated. For most of my writing the way it's it now is great but I'm riding some trails with a lot of rocks and bottoming out it has become a problem, what I need to do if I do change something as hard with my settings are now because it's perfect for most of my riding, but when I go to the tougher trails with the bigger rocks then the bottom out problem occurs.

I have a 2019 Wolverine X2 R-spec SE. Stock settings on shock preloads. Normally two passengers say 320 pounds and about 200 pounds of gear in the bed. Perhaps that'll help you in helping me make the right way to change the shocks.

Thanks is advance.

Pete
 

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My 2 cents is this. The above info you found and posted is pretty spot on in my opinion and I know where it came from. That said I don’t believe if you turn your slow speed compression in so it’s harder that you will gain any ride height. If you do it will be very minimal IMO. It will help with body roll a small bit if your sway bars are unhooked. It will help with how much the front end dives as you bounce over rocks and bottom out on a different one underneath, but will also feel stiffer in the ride quality.
The first thing I would do from all the playing around I’ve done with mine is add some of that rebound back. I have Eibach springs which require full soft settings of compression to be acceptable. Being that I’m a boulder bouncer I still wanted a more plush or boaty ride. I found it by turning my rebound settings counter clockwise. Mine aren’t even set full soft with my stiff springs. I suggest going back to the mid range of that setting which is the default setting and seeing if that solves it. If not I would add spring preload and keep compression settings full soft. The front springs just suck and mine did the same thing even when brand new. Before getting the Eibachs, which solve it, I actually maxed out preload, left rebound at default and went pretty close to full soft on both compression settings. The problem was cured it rode just fine and I gained on ground clearance. This was on a gen 1 which has a little better ride quality but it’s still the same shocks and same idea. I’d guess that the biggest issue is the rebound setting but stiffer springs whether aftermarket or through preload will help as well .
 
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