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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't looked at the shocks yet. I just got it home last night and took it for a short 10 minute ride. I could already tell it had too much body roll when cornering at mid to high speed. Does anyone know of there is and adjustment for Body Roll on the shocks?
 

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The springs are adjustable, however, the tool kit does not contain the tool to loosen the lock nut and tighten and relock the spring adjusters.

Many people use a drift to loosen the lock nut but a spanner wrench works much better for tightening or loosening the spring tension! Contact you dealer to find out the correct size spanner wrench.

Unless you are carrying a large load I would recommend not adjusting your shocks until you have over 100 miles on them. It takes over 100 miles to break in the shocks. Many people have not made significant changes to their shocks yet because although the front seems a little soft mine has seemed to stiffen up as I've put some miles on. The rear end is much stiffer and has a sway bar which is absent on the front.

We rode 87 miles yesterday in woody and hilly terrain at approximately 37-42 MPH average on mostly loose sandy soil or hard pack dirt getting about 15 MPG. 400 pound total added weight including cooler, people, fuel, tow strap, etc. and with 385 miles we are still using the factory shock settings. In these tight trails I can stay with friends with a 2015 RZR FOX Edition. They have more and tighter suspension but the wolverine ride is so sweet that we just wear them down and in time I can actually pull away from them. However on open faster trails where they are stretching their legs and doing jumps we are just a bit light on HP and they easily leave us in their dust with their 110 HP.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have always read the springs should only be used to adjust ride height. Some shocks have a knob or screw to adjust body roll.
 

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I have always read the springs should only be used to adjust ride height. Some shocks have a knob or screw to adjust body roll.
The shocks have high and low speed compression adjustment as well as rebound adjustability if that is the adjustment you are talking about. When you adjust those shock performance characteristics which could also reduce roll you also increase or decrease the the compliance of the suspension over bumps and obsticals which could adversely affect the ride of your Wolverine. Why don't you just ride it like it is for now and see what you think after a hundred or so miles and with/without a passenger and load.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Bringing this back up.... What screw do I turn and what direction to reduce the body roll? Thanks guys.
 

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Posted this before but here it is again.

The top screw NUT on the shock is High speed compression. Turning clockwise will harden the compression. Makes the wheel come up slower when hitting big bumps. An example for this is landing from a jump or hitting a rock. You'll feel more on normal bumps but less chance to bottom out on big ones.

The screw inside the High speed compression nut is low speed compression.. The low speed compression adjuster affects ride height, smoothness over small bumps and grip. Also, it's when the wheel moves up and down slow like a series of wide whoops or the action from the G force in the turn. IE.. going through a dip or sandy conditions will move the suspension in and out slowly.

Bottom is rebound.. Moving this clockwise makes the wheel release slower after being compressed. Will keep it from bucking you up.. but needs to be fast enough to stay on the ground to keep you in control. If it feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy then the rebound damping should be increased Also, if it doesn't go back down fast enough it can pump down over a whoop section. Saw a video with a razor hitting some whoop section and it ended up flipping over forward. That's because the rear shocks were not letting the tire go down fast enough to soak up the next bump. So the shock travel was getting shallower and shallower basically it had no shock after the 4th bump. Then boom it kicks on over.

That's pretty basic but a start.
 
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