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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the Wolverine and SxS's generally, have some mechanical aptitude having worked on various engines and done a number of mods on my trucks, sleds and quads over the years, however clutches are a grey area for me. I see lots of comments about modifying the Wolverine clutch when installing aftermarket tires/wheels. i also see comments about modifying the clutch when predominantly driving in rocky areas with lots of climbing or in areas with deep sand. Some people comment about just generally modifying the sheaves, etc., to improve overall performance.
So, for a guy with a Wolverine R-Spec who does a lot of hunting, mostly in mountainous areas; as well as a lot of touring around in various terrains from desert to swamps; frequently finds himself in mud and/or snow- do I need to modify my clutch or is it fine the way it is? What is involved in modifying a clutch? And, does modifying your clutch with aftermarket parts affect your warranty?
So, sitting here waiting to be educated . . .
 

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had the dealer put in a ten dollar shim in my clutch and works for me,i lost about 4mpg off my top end speed,but find it was worth it for the gain in low end torque,no issues with warranty this way either.
 

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Unless your a performance junkie who needs to unleash every bit of potential outta there machine by modding it, I personally would just keep it stock. The stock clutching will get the job done, yes you maybe able to pick up a bit more acceleration with a clutch kit or a few more mph on the top end. But I personally would just put that $ towards getting out and riding it more. The biggest thing would be to make sure your clutching is setup for your elevation, this is only really a issue if you consistently ride at high altitudes (rocky mountains). This way when you hammer down on the gas you are operating at the proper rpm and therefore making the most power possible. Your dealer can help you with this.
 

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The oem clutch is actually too small for the Wolverine and puts a tremendous load on the belt. Yamaha did that to save money. This is also why the stock maxxis tires are a lighter weight than normal.
 

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the wolvy is a great all-around recreational vehicle "right out of the box."
i would put a year or two into concentrating on how the vehicle performs when you ask it to deliver.
i think you will find that a stock vehicle will do everything you need it to do.

if you are mechanically inclined you can make changes after you know how your vehicle performs.
if you are not mechanically inclined you can create a lot of expensive repairs if you incorrectly install aftermarket parts.

there are those who are not satisfied with the stock machine and are obsessed with increasing performance, too.

if money is burning a hole in your pocket you can always accessorize and install windshield, lighting, etc.
 

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Tremendous load? Correct me if I am wring but would tremendous load not cause heat? So if there was a presence of "Tramendous" load the belt Temps would be higher then the grizzly 700? But on 2 100+ Mile rides the belt Temps only averaged 1 degree higher then the grizzly. Also not showing any excessive wear on the wet clutch over the grizzly after over 3000 miles of almost directly side by side riding if the two .... where is the signs of Tramendous load ... right ... there is none ..

Too thee OP do not let this forum convince you that you need to modify the clutches with machining to obtain better performance. 90% of cvt performance gains on this machine come from a secondary spring and weights. The machining just gains you low end which the machine does not lack. The Wolverine will operate just fine in Stock format or slightly larger tire form. It is a very well built machine and durable .. it is up to you if you want or feel the need to add performance through the clutches but the machine does not need it
 

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While I did clutch and fuel programmer on mine, I'm not sure that would be for you. If the majority of your riding is for hunting I can't see where you would need it. Stock should be more than sufficient.
 

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Tremendous load? Correct me if I am wring but would tremendous load not cause heat? So if there was a presence of "Tramendous" load the belt Temps would be higher then the grizzly 700? But on 2 100+ Mile rides the belt Temps only averaged 1 degree higher then the grizzly. Also not showing any excessive wear on the wet clutch over the grizzly after over 3000 miles of almost directly side by side riding if the two .... where is the signs of Tramendous load ... right ... there is none ..

Too thee OP do not let this forum convince you that you need to modify the clutches with machining to obtain better performance. 90% of cvt performance gains on this machine come from a secondary spring and weights. The machining just gains you low end which the machine does not lack. The Wolverine will operate just fine in Stock format or slightly larger tire form. It is a very well built machine and durable .. it is up to you if you want or feel the need to add performance through the clutches but the machine does not need it
The Wolverine ultramatic clutch was originally designed for a vehicle that weighted 640 pounds, one rider, pulling with 40hp and 25 inch tires. Now, the same exact clutch (other than slight tuning) is pulling 1300lbs + 2-drivers/gear, 48hp and +26" tires. So yes, there is a gigantic load on the belt, even in stock form.
 

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I'm new to the Wolverine and SxS's generally, have some mechanical aptitude having worked on various engines and done a number of mods on my trucks, sleds and quads over the years, however clutches are a grey area for me. I see lots of comments about modifying the Wolverine clutch when installing aftermarket tires/wheels. i also see comments about modifying the clutch when predominantly driving in rocky areas with lots of climbing or in areas with deep sand. Some people comment about just generally modifying the sheaves, etc., to improve overall performance.
So, for a guy with a Wolverine R-Spec who does a lot of hunting, mostly in mountainous areas; as well as a lot of touring around in various terrains from desert to swamps; frequently finds himself in mud and/or snow- do I need to modify my clutch or is it fine the way it is? What is involved in modifying a clutch? And, does modifying your clutch with aftermarket parts affect your warranty?
So, sitting here waiting to be educated . . .


First off, I am not sure why, but sheaves and clutching are a largely debated subject on this and other forums alike. It really shouldn't be, as it is not some "black art", it is just physics and mechanical engineering. With that being said, you will encounter people on both sides of the argument, and they will swear on their life that they are correct. It is up to you to decide for yourself after being presented with the facts.

Now, judging by your statement, the simple short answer is NO, you don't NEED to modify your "clutch". The long answer, is YES, you SHOULD modify your clutch...and I will explain why.

The term "clutch" here is being used to describe an entire assembly of parts, including the Primary and Secondary sheave sets, a belt, a one-way bearing, and a wet-clutch shoe assembly with a drum. There are a lot of parts involved here in one assembly.

The stock setup is designed to be SMOOTH, and it is incredibly smooth, above 5-8mph anyway. The stock setup shares similar components and design to the Rhino, which was a lighter machine. However, they changed it up a bit to give the Wolverine a higher top speed. This is part of the reason Flyer suggested the belt being under tremendous load in comparison to the Rhino. He is not incorrect, and the extra load isn't generating excessive heat because it is a constant belt tension design, it doesn't slip like a Polaris for example. This is where the wet clutch comes in.

The stock wet clutch is designed to engage slowly and smoothly for easy starting from a dead stop. If you add heavier than stock tires, and especially taller than stock tires, you will increase the loading of that clutch, and it WILL wear faster. It is not going to implode or anything crazy, but the useful life will be decreased. It will be further decreased if you go with even taller tires, like a 30" for example. In that range, you do run the risk of permanent, irreparable damage to the wet-clutch. The solution to this problem is called "slugging" the wet-clutch. Since the wet-clutch is operated by centrifugal force, we add extra weight to the shoes to make them engage with more force against the drum, and do so sooner than stock. This offers you less slippage and wear on the clutch shoes, and lets you run larger tires without risk of damage. It also allows you to idle along your hunting trails at a lower rpm than stock, and crawl up over obstacle at slower speeds when necessary. This brings us to the Machined Sheave mod.

A machined sheave is just that, it is the outer half of the primary sheave assembly, with some machining done to it to change the drive ratio both on the low end, and the top end. It gives you a lower ratio on the bottom, which allows lower crawling speeds, and a slightly higher ratio on the top end, which allows higher top speeds. The benefit here is not just for the "performance junky", because let's face it, if you were that much a performance junky, you would have purchased a 1000cc machine. The utility benefit is very high here, in the respect that the lower gear ratio will allow less load on the belt, and the wet-clutch when you are towing or hauling say a moose out of the woods for example. This will extend the life of your wet-clutch past what it would be if left stock, it will also increase the pulling capability, due to higher applied torque to the wheels. Essentially, you are getting more power to the ground when starting out from a dead stop. Now, on the performance side, you will absolutely notice a HUGE difference in acceleration over stock, and the backshifting will be faster as well. This refers to mashing the pedal when cruising at 25mph for example, and the CVT assembly "downshifts" and you accelerate. The CVT changes ratio based on engine load and speed, and the machined sheave kit (with heavier spring) will help this function better than stock, especially with larger tires.

So, with this brief synopsis, you should be able to do some more research on your own, watch some videos, etc. To answer the question about what is involved to modify the clutch, a beginner with mechanical skills could do a slug and sheave kit in about 6 hours, and that's including the time to cuss and drink and figure out how to take all the pieces off the machine to even get to the CVT assembly LOL. As for the warranty question, YES, technically Yamaha can refuse to warranty any failure on the machine that it deems was caused by your modification. There is always that risk. However, it all depends on your local dealer, some don't care what is modified, some do.

If it were me in your shoes, based on your riding habits you list, I would want to slug the wet-clutch and add a machined sheave. BUT, that is just my opinion...and we ALL know what they say about opinions....

Good Luck

FTM
 

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The temperature difference between a grizzly and the Wolverine isn't huge because there is more than double the air going to the cvt belt. The Wolverine uses both the 660 and The 700 cooling system combined with larger tubing. Even so, the belt temperatures are higher.
 

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I totally agree with Fordtruckman and his description was very accurate.

I was using my wolverine with a sprayer in the back to spray around my pond Sunday morning, guess what my speed was all the way around??? 0 yup ZERO and I was moving, the speedo never got off zero the whole time. I don't think it registers until 3mph but the point is, you simply can't do that in stock form and I was not excessively wearing anything either due to having our slug kit and sheave in it.

I would say if you have any application for it then it benefits you, if you don't then you don't.

Todd
 

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The temperature difference between a grizzly and the Wolverine isn't huge because there is more than double the air going to the cvt belt. The Wolverine uses both the 660 and The 700 cooling system combined with larger tubing. Even so, the belt temperatures are higher.
Ever see the temperature difference between a Grizzly and a Viking? I've seen melted weights and disintegrated belts in the Viking. Vikings lack the Wolverine cooling system. Add snorkels to a Wolverine, let me know how that works out for ya.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks everyone. This information has been very helpful. Confirmed some things I was thinking; taught me some stuff I needed to know. For the time being, I think I will leave it as is. I have 1, 000 km on it at the moment and I feel it performs well for what I use it for. However, keeping in mind FTM's last post I will consider a mod in the future. All is good!
 
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