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Put about another 80 miles on my machine today and ended up having overheating problems. Looks like the the radatior packed so much with mud that it wouldn't cool. Was really bad on the lower corners by the A arms. Had to limp it along about 1.5 miles at a time because the temp light kept coming on til I could get it to a place to hose it out.

Temp light didn't come on the rest of the day but I did notice that if you shut it off hot the temp light would be on for a few seconds til it started circulating again.

I'm thinking about fabing up some sheet metal deflectors to try to keep the mud out, just worried its going to keep too much air out as well.

Kinda disappointed in the design I guess if your going to put it in a place like that I guess it should be sized bigger or better protected.

Any input on some fixes is welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Was the mud packed from the front or the back?
From the front, I don't think you can pack the back. I believe it is all covered with the cowl for the fan. It was so bad on the bottom on both sides, where pic is that I couldn't see the fins. I guess the only thing to try is making some deflectors IMG_20150523_190203_157.jpg
 

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Gotcha, ya I sent that last message before I cleaned the machine Monday lol. Mine was packed pretty good too. I will have to do some experimenting with shielding for sure.
 

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Yeah i can't believe no one else is having this issue. I can't imagine I'm the only one riding thru mud like this. To be honest I was only riding around 30 mph when it started overheating, so its not like I was on it hard
 

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Yeah i can't believe no one else is having this issue. I can't imagine I'm the only one riding thru mud like this. To be honest I was only riding around 30 mph when it started overheating, so its not like I was on it hard
My Maverick did this ALL the time. Unfortunately, I don't think any machine is immune to this. Mud in the radiator is just that. Unfortunately, putting stuff over it will probably reduce air flow. If you prevent mud from getting to it, you also prevent air.

I was thinking about loading up a couple landscape sprayers with water in case there are no close water holes to drive through.
 

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Well mine was packed up pretty good but it was also pretty cool where I was at, only 60s-70s during the day. Just a tip, you could always pack a few extra water bottles when you ride(we carry a cooler anyway)and if it gets too clogged, poke a hole in the cap of the water bottle and squeeze it on the radiator. It certainly won't be like having a hose, but it will definitely help. As for the guarding idea, I wouldn't be too concerned with it blocking the airflow, as you are not relying on vehicle speed here to get airflow. The fan shroud is designed to flow an adequate amount of air while the vehicle is parked, so as long as the guarding is not right up against the radiator, you should be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Well mine was packed up pretty good but it was also pretty cool where I was at, only 60s-70s during the day. Just a tip, you could always pack a few extra water bottles when you ride(we carry a cooler anyway)and if it gets too clogged, poke a hole in the cap of the water bottle and squeeze it on the radiator. It certainly won't be like having a hose, but it will definitely help. As for the guarding idea, I wouldn't be too concerned with it blocking the airflow, as you are not relying on vehicle speed here to get airflow. The fan shroud is designed to flow an adequate amount of air while the vehicle is parked, so as long as the guarding is not right up against the radiator, you should be just fine.
I was thinking restricted air flow would be better than a packed radiator. What I was actually thinking was some shields with some holes or slots in them to keep out most of the mud and still allow a little air.

I'm not sure how much air it gets straight on because isn't there an oil cooler in front of the radiator?

Also looking at different engine oils that might run a little cooler. I know my 06 bruin, which was air cooled, ran a lot cooler when I switched to amsoil. Just not sure on this application yet.
 

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I've seen this before, but not on my wolverine. This is a common issue with people that hardcore mud their machine. Most atv around here relocate the radiator for that exact reason, the same for the can am mr (mud racing) line of vehicles.

My grizzly had it bad, but we learned to avoid packing it with mud if possible, and we'd park the front in ponds to cool the rad and loosen mud. This helped a lot, as well as washing the radiator when going back to the head of the trail before going out and ride again... Even if it wasn't getting hot. This was standard practice and just about eliminated our grizzly over heating.

I mudded hard this weekend and my radiator stayed clean. I also out of habit from the grizzly would turn the engine off but leave the key on so the fan would run during the beer stops on the trail.

I suspect the reason you're caked with mud is #1 the constancy of the mud and #2 the speed you hit it with.

Going full speed blows mud up and into the path of the radiator, going slower but fast enough will reduce this. Although it might not be as fun as blasting at full speed, that should keep you riding trouble free all day..

Also, check your coolant. I realized I'm below full, I believe the dealership aren't warning them up enough to add the correct amount of coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did hit some of the holes hard. As far as leaving the fan on its better than nothing, but the problem is that it only cools the little bit of coolant that's in the radiator and not the engine. Like I said I noticed if you turned it off hot the temp light would come on for a few seconds til it started circulating.

One thing I did notice helped some is if it was hot was leave the fan on and start it every couple minutes to get the hot coolant from the motor to the radiator
 

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This is not the wolverine's fault, its the mud in your radiator's fault. Keep it clean, like someone said bring something along that would help you wash it out if your riding in mud that often. I just rode threw slow trails this weekend in low for over and hour in almost 90 degree humid temps and the machine never once got hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This is not the wolverine's fault, its the mud in your radiator's fault. Keep it clean, like someone said bring something along that would help you wash it out if your riding in mud that often. I just rode threw slow trails this weekend in low for over and hour in almost 90 degree humid temps and the machine never once got hot.
I'm sorry but I didn't exactly buy the machine to ride around slow or avoid the mud holes with, nor did they design it for that purpose
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I just thought of this and am not near my machine to really look so maybe someone could help me out. I believe that is an oil cooler located up front in front of the radiator? I bet if you could mount a fan on that would greatly help keep it cool? Just tie it in with the power from the main fan?

I don't know just thinking
 

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I'm sorry but I didn't exactly buy the machine to ride around slow or avoid the mud holes with, nor did they design it for that purpose
You think they designed it to overheat and plow threw deep mud then? What I was explaining is that if you can ride it slow in low for hours in very hot temperatures without it overheating, its not the machines fault that its overheating on you, its simply the fact that the radiator is plugged and I advised you to find a way to clean it out if thats the type of riding that you do. I was just telling you why your more than likely having an issue. My friend carries a sprayer in his bed just to avoid this problem if it occurs.
 

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True be told, if we got bored we could relocate the radiator to the rear of the roll cage. I wouldn't do that unless it's a full mud machine..
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You think they designed it to overheat and plow threw deep mud then? What I was explaining is that if you can ride it slow in low for hours in very hot temperatures without it overheating, its not the machines fault that its overheating on you, its simply the fact that the radiator is plugged and I advised you to find a way to clean it out if thats the type of riding that you do. I was just telling you why your more than likely having an issue. My friend carries a sprayer in his bed just to avoid this problem if it occurs.
I'm sorry and dont mean to offend you in any way but I don't see carrying a sprayer around as a permanent solution to keep a machine from overheating that was designed for off road use.

It wasn't like I was pounding it thru crazy mud all day. 3 other quads ran thru the same stuff I did with no issues. But then again maybe I'm just expecting too much.

However I think some improvements are possible with some shielding and possibly an additional fan.

At this point I don't think I'm ready to relocate the radiator.

Has anyone else considered a fan on the oil cooler with some additional deflectors? Or am I just too far out in left field on this one?
 
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