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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a new wolverine r spec about a month ago. Only pushed a little snow with it nothing hard. Noticed my coolant level was low. It was full when I bought it. I did the cvt fix along with the rear diff vent hose fix and making sure the water pump vent hose wasn't pinched. Anyone else have this issue? Should I worry about it? I did check the dipstick and drain just a little oil didn't appear to be milky to me but I don't know how milky it would look either on the dipstick. Thanks for any advice!
 

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I know a few people on here said it went low after a little time, myself included. Other than the one incident with the pinched water pump vent, I think most everyone topped it off and had no further issues. I just chocked it up to working air pockets out of the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok I will keep an eye on it. The vent tube from your rear diff needs to be zip tied otherwise it will fall down. The water pump vent can get pinched from factory under the gas tank. I did the cvt fix that I seen on YouTube. Trying to get the little fixes done so I don't have to worry. But I noticed my coolant level was low so I wanted to see if anyone had the same issue. Thanks for the responses!
 

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I use water-less coolant. Never over heats, never corrodes, never cavitates , never blows your seals out and is good down to -100 and up to +387F. I'm sure you have heard of Evans coolant. I used to work for a company that sold Evans coolants, and then I worked for the company that made Evans coolants. Evans coolants typically sell for $60 a gallon, but I can show you how to get it for $13/gal. Anyway, food for thought.
 

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Evans coolants typically sell for $60 a gallon, but I can show you how to get it for $13/gal. Anyway, food for thought.
$13 not that much more than plain ole anti-freeze these days. I'd be interested in learning more.
 
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Not all coolants are the same, so please don't run and grab any coolant off the shelf for this trick. There are basically three base chemical compounds we use to move heat from internal combustion engines to heat exchangers. Ethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol and glycerin. We mostly use Ethylene glycol in our radiators. Of these three, there is almost an infinite amount of combinations and that's not even getting into formulations of the additives. Some coolant companies sell concentrated coolants and few of them do not include any measurable amount of water. One of my jobs were to test other manufactures products and record their performance. I know of at least two of these which can be added to a coolant system straight and without mixing in water. Removal of the water is key, since it is the water which causes corrosion of both your engine and to the glycol formulation in the form of formic and oxalic acid. So again, please do not run to your supplier and try to run any straight antifreeze in your radiator, the results may be unsatisfactory.

So, of the hundreds of coolants I tested, I now personally run two of them, one of which I run today in my rhino, my motorcycles, my cars and my trucks. The first one is Oreilly's black bottle concentrated which boils at +387°F and the second one is SuperTech concentrated which boils at +374°F. Both of these are rated down to -100F. Only these two can be ran in this manner. I am sure there are others, but these are the two in which I tested in my lab and have raced with in my motorcycles. The bottles of which are the two images below. Sometimes I can find these on sale for $9.99/gallon and is when I usually stock up. Remember, no water, so you must completely drain your radiator, engines and lines first.

 

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Sounds great.........if we can trust the manufacturer not to change the formulation on us.
 

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Timken, I'll be dammed if you aren't right under the most interesting man in the world that advertises Dos Equis Beer. Amazing career. LOL :cool:
 
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You are pretty safe with the Oreilly's, plus it's the better of the two. Thanks Allout, I have some stories for the campfire I guess. No, I generally enjoy helping others, and this is something that just bullet proofs the cooling systems on these little buggies. There's no boiling, so the coolant is always in contact with the heat surface. Water transfers 16% more heat than glycol, but only up to about 165 degrees when it begins to form a skin of insulative bubbles on the metallic surface. It is still able to cool but it's efficiency goes downward to a point in which the pure glycol is more effective, especially at elevated temperatures during climbing and crawling.
 

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So are those used to replace or to top off existing ?
 

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I would look into that. I wonder if they finally put a drain at the bottom of the radiator on the Wolverine. Also, I bet there is a purge located somewhere on top of the engine.
 
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