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The day before Christmas Eve I decided to take my rhino to a friend’s house so I could drink beer with him after working 2nd shift. Going down a pole line sattlebaged it bad. Walked a few miles home to get my truck and a heavy chain. Broke the chain trying to jerk it out smashed the tailgate up. I couldn’t get traction with the mud clogging up the truck tires. Went back home again got a friends truck with a 10000 pound winch chained the truck to a power line pole winched it in. Needless to say I didn’t make it to work that day ended up loosing a days pay plus 3 days holiday pay because you need to work the scheduled day before and after the holiday or take vacation which I didn’t have. Expensive trip never made it to my friends house. To this day I still carry a synthetic winch rope with me just Incase my winch cable isn’t long enough.
 

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I’ve been able to self rescue a few times and now only ride frequently used trails when alone. On one ride a friend blew a head gasket on his Atv. He tore it down on the trail, made a gasket of duct tape and rode it in. Another time a new Canam wouldn’t start so we towed it to the last hill above the campground. He rolled through camp with no motor sound smiling and waving at campers who could not believe how quiet his machine was.
shovel, straps, extenders, pulleys , shackles are all standard equipment plus a battery jump cell, change of clothes and bug headnet if stuck in the swamp.
semper paratus
 
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I archery hunt antelope over water. the water holes I hunt are 21 miles from our trucks. My biggest fear is my ATV breaking down. That would be a brutal walk, no cell service, over lava rocks and 100 degree weather. I have since sold the sportsman 500 and now will use my RMAX or my TW200.

I do carry always a tow strap but still fearful of having to hike for hours if something happens
 
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I archery hunt antelope over water. the water holes I hunt are 21 miles from our trucks. My biggest fear is my ATV breaking down. That would be a brutal walk, no cell service, over lava rocks and 100 degree weather.
21 miles? I'd keep a lightweight tent and sleeping bag in the RMAX and wait for my wife to report me missing
 

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Just curious to hear from those who have ever been out riding alone, and had a catastrophic machine breakdown. Did you have to walkout? How far? Daytime, nightime? How'd you secure your machine that you left behind? How'd you get your machine back to home base?

Luckily, I've never had this happen to me, but I look forward to useful comments/suggestions in case I ever do breakdown.
We just about got stranded in Arkansas with absolutely NO service and over 10 miles back in. We are going to buy an inreach satellite phone from Garmin. They’re not to pricey and the monthly service bills are very reasonable. We do a lot of highway traveling and boating with sketchy cell service so decided this little life saver will go everywhere with us.
 

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I carry the InReach on backcountry trips
 
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A couple of years ago I decided to go riding by myself in my new machine up a seldom traveled old mining road in the mountains. I had not yet put a winch on the machine. Not good to go riding by yourself in the early spring when there are still snow drifts here and there, and no winch if you get into trouble. I did have the sense to have a come-a-long and some tow straps in the tool box in the bed. There was one stretch where the snow had drifted across the road and looked to be about 6 inches deep, for about 50 feet long. No problem I think to myself, I got a run at the section and was quite shocked when I lost all traction and came to a halt with all wheels still spinning. It seems there was a dip in the road where the snow was about 2 feet deep and I simply bottomed out and was resting on the belly pan on top of the snow with no traction at all for the wheels. And me with no winch and just a measly come-a-long, and a GI shovel. Two hours later and this one very tired old geezer finally got the machine back to the 6-inch deep snow (a whole 3 foot long pull!) and could go back down where my lunch and water was, and lick my wounds. Bottom line: never go out alone, wait until you have your winch on, and always get stuck (if you have to get stuck) where there are good trees close to the road that you can hook up to. Spindly little 2-3 inch round trees don't work well to tie on to!
 
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