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Read the service manual for proper way. It also depends on if you are going to torque them as per specs or want to uga-duga. $.02
 

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Would it be a good idea or a bad idea to put Loc Tite on both primary and secondary clutch nuts as well as bearing support housing bolts??
My opinion would be an emphatic no on the (4) bolts that attach the cage that supports the end of the primary shaft. These 4 bolts are soft and are torqued to a very low torque. They can tend to corrode some in place, making them harder to get out, when they haven't been removed in a fairly long time. By adding any LocTite to them is going to add more resistance to get them out and may cause you to break off one of these bolts that are not hardened. I have not ever heard of anyone having a primary cage bolt come loose. I believe Jomo had 1 break off in the hole a couple of years ago and it sounded like a pretty big ordeal to get it out.

On the primary and secondary nuts, don't know that it would matter much one way or the other, if they are tightened properly. I doubt that blue LocTite would really do much good on a nut that is supposed to be torqued as much as the primary nut is. If the primary nut were to be loose, then there is just to much force for blue LocTite to hold it is my $.02. Tighten and torque everything to specs. and no need for LocTite unless the manual calls for it.
 

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Let me stir the pot lol............ I could be a little wrong here but do not think so..... If you lube threads, you are changing the sliding friction of the threads and the resulting clamping pressures and maybe the yield of the fasteners as well as the base thread material. So torque specs get adjusted. I know in TTY bolts (maybe not all) that the threads are required to be lubed and premier companies like ARP have a house lubricant they require to be used on many of their fasteners. Method beadlock wheels IIRC have two torque figures depending on lube or no lube. And Loctite till cured is lubed, right? Now I will need to do a little research and engineer types jump on on this........
 

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It's a NO from me on any lock tight on anything inside the CVT. Just torque to specs.

Anti seize on lug nuts will facilitate over torque causing the threads to wear out after removing and reinstalling the wheels a few times. Never had this happen before, but it happened to me last year for the very first time. After years of religiously applying anti-seize to lug nuts. I ended up replacing every wheel stud & lug nut. So... there's that.
 

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Let me stir the pot lol............ I could be a little wrong here but do not think so..... If you lube threads, you are changing the sliding friction of the threads and the resulting clamping pressures and maybe the yield of the fasteners as well as the base thread material. So torque specs get adjusted. I know in TTY bolts (maybe not all) that the threads are required to be lubed and premier companies like ARP have a house lubricant they require to be used on many of their fasteners. Method beadlock wheels IIRC have two torque figures depending on lube or no lube. And Loctite till cured is lubed, right? Now I will need to do a little research and engineer types jump on on this........
Great comment and is what I’ve also been told by bolt manufacturers. Bolt torque values are determined by the stretch of the material and spec’d either dry or using a specific lubricant. A lubricated bolt will stretch more than a dry bolt given the same torque setting on the wrench.
 

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That's not good. I've anti seized my lug nuts already.
Zero issues on every auto I've ever owned, and every off-road machine until the KRX. I lost three wheel studs on the KRX, the threads just wore out/pulled off. One thing that is different on that machine is the wheels are lug centric, not hub centric. Anyway I changed all the KRX wheel studs and quite using anti-seize.
 
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I started using some wheel bearing grease on studs several decades ago when I had some experience with wheels and studs rusting and seized. I have noticed for several years that the more contemporary studs seem to be more rust resistant, so I am not as prone to use some coating if the wheels will get removed periodically. Plus they're all aluminum wheels now. I do not like anti-seize for that as much as wheel bearing grease, cause it gets on everything lol, and it has better cling so always there to collect grit. I also have learned not to use too much grease, if I use it, as it is a dirt collector and the grit certainly can wear on threads especially with impact speeds. Exception is on Trailer wheels which seem to not get the rotation attention so I will swipe the mounting pads and the studs with boat trailer grease and that has worked well for me. Only studs I have ever replaced are the ones which the numb-nuts diesel college boys that work at Firestone, and Discount Tire (2) screwed up on my vehicles. I would have made them do it but the time, inconvenience and lack of confidence in them to do it right was not there. In fairness, Discount seems to have now trained the wheel changers so that it is not necessary to tell them every time, " hand start and hand torque" . But they are starting to use the torque rods so I loosen and retighten mine when I get home.
 

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Zero issues on every auto I've ever owned, and every off-road machine until the KRX. I lost three wheel studs on the KRX, the threads just wore out/pulled off. One thing that is different on that machine is the wheels are lug centric, not hub centric. Anyway I changed all the KRX wheel studs and quite using anti-seize.
If the studs wore out, and you probably checked this but for others not as knowledgeable, as the wheels get loose, even ever so slightly, and start to move, even ever so slightly, then they begin to grind on the studs and the softer aluminum wheel will loose material in the lug seat and start to wear an egg shape. So check the wheel lug nut seats for true cone and concentric-ness.
And always make sure that if lug nuts are changed, that they are compatible angles with the wheels or they can loosen.
 

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Would tinkseal outperform nickel anti-sieze on an application like the exhaust tip bolts?
I use TinkSeal instead of anti-seize because one of the nano particles will withstand over 3000°F. I have had mixed results with antiseize paste, but never had a stuck nut after TinkSeal application.
 

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@B52U You know the downside of TS is that if you get it on something you want friction on, you are totally screwed. I put it on one of those sliding window locks once, not thinking about what I was doing. That window doesn't lock anymore.
 
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