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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Initally, I felt that the KYB's were to stiff.
After they break in and settle, they need adjusted for individual riding requirements.

Just my thoughts on adjustments and I hope others chime in for discussion also.

**Speed compression is how quickly the shock reacts and not vehicle speed dependent.

After you have added all the items that you trail ride with normally, i.e. loaded bed with cooler and other items, 2 passengers, etc, etc

1) First should be adjusting THREADED SPRING PRELOAD to set ride height relative to factory settings.
(balance the weight distribution across the front and rear wheels while setting up the ride height)

2) LOW-SPEED COMPRESSION. This is body roll, acceleration & braking squat, adjustment.
If you want less body roll when cornering, you need to increase (+) and vice versa.

3) HIGH-SPEED COMPRESSION. Controls damping resistance when the shock is being compressed quickly.
I like to start off full soft and travel my favorite trail when setting up shocks. When I hit a spot that bottoms out the machine, I increase (+) 1/4 turn and travel that area at that speed again and see if I need more adjustment. (keep rebound in mind here also, I'll explain later)

4) REBOUND DAMPING. Controls how quickly the shock absorber returns to its position.
To much rebound (- soft) can cause bucking, to little (+ hard) and the shock packs and can compound the bottoming out issue. This will also affect handling as you want to get your tires back on the ground for traction.

In a nut shell..

So you have your machine loaded for your normal riding conditions, load etc.
With that load, you have spring preload set for ride height, front and back.
Drive the machine on some switch back roads at moderate speed and adjust LOW-SPEED COMPRESSION setting to get the body roll set to your preference. No whoops here, so I'll end there.

After you are good with those setting, most adjustments need to be made between HIGH-SPEED COMPRESSION & REBOUND DAMPING.
These 2 settings need to work together to maintain the machines ride to meet your riding style/conditions while also maintaining handling/control.

I prefer front REBOUND DAMPING full soft. I want my tires back on the ground quickly for handling (steering)/traction. For the rear, I start off full soft and increase rear REBOUND DAMPING to eliminate bucking/bouncing.

Once you have the machines shock settings 'roughed' in to where you are good with their general performance and understand how the shock reacts, you can fine tune them from there so see how they respond.
 

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Subscribed, looking forward to learning more. Thank you.
 
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Pretty much agree with all said!

I will add, if you have switched to Eibach springs then you can pretty much soften up the slow speed dampening to full soft or close to, since the body roll is now not a factor. Also they are stiff enough that you will find that you need to, IMO

After doing all stated by Skelly and being in the ballpark, now is the time to pick different sections of trail and ride them over and over at the same speed while adjusting rebound settings 1 to 2 clicks at a time and fast compression 1/8 to 1/4 turns at a time. This is when you start to notice the dramatic difference between 1 click of the rebound setting or 1/8 turn of fast speed compression.


Try high speed cornering, try whoops, then try slow speed boulder bouncing. If your riding style is only 1 or 2 of those then it’s simpler. Mine is mostly boulder bouncing but it took me about 3 trips recently after changing some things regarding the lift and springs to dial mine in. I have finally found a compromise that is acceptable to me between the fast driving/handling and the boulder bouncing.

The biggest secret dialing in the final tune to be soft enough in big rocks and firm enough for handling at high speed turned out to be a click or 2 of the rebound and nothing to do with compression settings and going back and forth a click was very noticeable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think spending time on the shock setting is the best thing you can do.
Machines with more travel and dual rate springs can afford to be off on their settings and not notice as much ill effect.
Since we are limited to 9" of travel, the better you adjust them for your riding style, the longer that 9" will feel.

Tires & air pressure are also part of the ride quality as much as they are about traction. So keep this in mind also.
 

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1 pound of air is a noticeable difference!
 

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2019 Yamaha Wolverine X2
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What PSI are you all running?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Kenda Bear Claw HTR, 10 psi all around, but going to drop the front to 8 or 9 I think, just for contact patch reasons.
Love the ride, traction and handling of these tires.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Since adding the Perfex lift and setting the rear in the 2" lift hole, it puts the shock out at a more vertical angle. I set the rear HIGH-SPEED COMPRESSION to full soft.
It rides just as good as before and maybe even slightly better.
The more the shock is to 90 degrees of A-arm travel, the less "work" it has to do as angle and leverage come into play.

The Front has a slight more angle inward with the lift, but I left it alone for now.

Every group ride I go on and when we stop to take a break, we usually talk shop about our machines.
As guys are telling me about their shocks, I like to go around bouncing them to get a feel of how they have them set.
Of course you can't do this to live or active shocks as the are reset to normal-hard when the car is off.

I've tested the bounce on a lot of machines, 800-1000 RZRs, Rangers, Zforces, Talons, etc, etc,
I have yet to find a machine with settings that have anything close to the softness as the front of my X2.
Most guys I talked to are still running factory settings and know nothing about shocks. Not all machines have fully adjustable shocks either.

I'm no expert by any means, it's just something I've noticed and learn more about every day.
 

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Interesting, I have not tried the 2" spot in the rear yet.

Kenda Bear Claw HTR, 10 psi all around, but going to drop the front to 8 or 9 I think, just for contact patch reasons.
Love the ride, traction and handling of these tires.
Did you ever drop down to 8 psi? I am running 8 in all of mine now. It's extremely temperature sensitive. I bought the 0-15 psi JACO gage. I put the tires at 8 in the morning and just go with that all day. I have enough time/miles in without a bead break that I'm comfortable with the 8 psi. I do have that sealant in though.
 
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The more the shock is to 90 degrees of A-arm travel, the less "work" it has to do as angle and leverage come into play.

The Front has a slight more angle inward with the lift, but I left it alone for now.
.
IIRC (ha) The Shock Therapy expert on his video said that the goal for perfect design shock angle is when the A-arm is fully compressed in the up travel, the shock should be 90 deg with the a-arm.

BTW I love to see your interest in this subject and think you have contributed a lot to the forum and particularly those who may struggle with this matter, as you have made it easier for them to taste the difference by your recommendations.
 

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Interesting, I have not tried the 2" spot in the rear yet.



Did you ever drop down to 8 psi? I am running 8 in all of mine now. It's extremely temperature sensitive. I bought the 0-15 psi JACO gage. I put the tires at 8 in the morning and just go with that all day. I have enough time/miles in without a bead break that I'm comfortable with the 8 psi. I do have that sealant in though.
Paul you got me to thinking about this and I started to respond about pressures here but did not want to hijack thread for respect of OP. So I started another thread on Sweet spot contact patch. Hope you check it out as I posted........
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Interesting, I have not tried the 2" spot in the rear yet.



Did you ever drop down to 8 psi? I am running 8 in all of mine now. It's extremely temperature sensitive. I bought the 0-15 psi JACO gage. I put the tires at 8 in the morning and just go with that all day. I have enough time/miles in without a bead break that I'm comfortable with the 8 psi. I do have that sealant in though.
I lowered it to where I liked the contact patch then checked. I was at 8, but was a little nervous without my bead locks and went back up.
That night I popped the bead off twice and tore a valve stem off, I was at 10 psi. In all fairness, the holes were really deep with near vertical climbs out.
I had to get guys to stand on my front bumper to help hold it down.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
IIRC (ha) The Shock Therapy expert on his video said that the goal for perfect design shock angle is when the A-arm is fully compressed in the up travel, the shock should be 90 deg with the a-arm.

BTW I love to see your interest in this subject and think you have contributed a lot to the forum and particularly those who may struggle with this matter, as you have made it easier for them to taste the difference by your recommendations.
Thanks jimclemjr, I'm learning as I go also. I research, do trial/error, research again and try problem solving to achieve a successful outcome.
Then I post my thoughts and findings on the forum and even learn more from the discussions that we have. :D
 
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You guys are great contributors, and I'm sure we have all been on different boards for different things and can agree: this forum is special.

So, I had two bead breaks where mud entered my beads when I was running the 27" Dirt Commanders. Went to the Kenda Bear Claw HTR in same size, but added that Multi Seal, 32 oz per tire. Literally added like 2 lbs per wheel. Anyway, zero issue with air pressure on the same rides. I wonder if that's it, I'm running 8 psi in the morning. I have checked later in the day (hot summer) and its 10 psi. Then later that night after it cools down, 8.5 psi.

I think for this you need a 0-15 psi gage. I have tested other gages and its not the same. Any gage is subjective unless you use the same gage for all your checks.
 

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It amazes me how many people never touch the adjustments on the shocks.

Paul, I just tossed a gauge because I couldn't get repeatable readings from it. Figured it out on accident, now the first tire checked gets checked 3 times to make sure the gauge is working correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I've been running these settings for a while now.
Summer is coming, so we hit the faster trails and dirt back roads.
I will increase Rebound for those unexpected humps that cause the backend to buck at faster speeds.
 
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I'm running with sway bars connected. We ride faster than most. Soft very comfortable ride!

28" tires 12psi
12" ground clearance both front and back

Front
Preload 13.5"
Slow 14 out
Fast 1.5 out
Rebound 20 out

Rear
Preload 13.75"
Slow 14 out
Fast 1.25 out
Rebound 18 out
 
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