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I ride trails where the average speed is 10-25 mph, but open up in some spots where you can run 35 plus for a mile or so. Do you ride mostly in low gear, then shift into high when the trail permits higher speeds, or do you stay in high all the time. How slow can you safely go in high range without risk of overheating the the CVT? I am new to the CVT world, so please don't bash me if this is a dumb question. I rode ATVs as a kid, but back then they were mainly shift models with an auto clutch.
 

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Moved post to appropriate area. I'm sure others will chime in. I run in High most of the time unless I am climbing hills or in really thick mud. At slow speeds, the belt is cooled better when shifted into low gear position:).
 

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Personally, I run in low on the trails where I'm going no faster than 15-20 mph. If I'm opening it up a little ill stop and shift into high.
 
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Good question. I've wondered the same. With my Grizzly I've probably used low 10 times in 7500 miles, but I've read that guys use low range a good bit in a SxS.
Personally I use high almost exclusively around home, unless I'm trying to maneuver in a tight spot. When I ride technical stuff like Wind rock, etc I use low most of the time
 

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After my Hunterworks Monster sheave, titanium spring and Detroit locker Wet Clutch, I climbed to the top of Mount Everest pulling 35" BFG's, two stuck Razors, 12 climbers and a pack mule, all in high gear! :cool: - lol

Even if you have a clutch as ultimately low as a Hunterworks or the Gates Carbon fiber belt (up to 30% stronger), you should still operate in low gear when pulling a grade or if you are heavy loaded/pulling a trailer, wood, etc.. Like Flyer mentioned earlier, the clutch will be spinning faster therefor the fans attached to the sheaves will be blowing more air across the belt in low gear. Also, think of your belt like you are pulling on a rope, you are pulling really pretty hard in high gear and it is easier to pull against when in low gear. Sure, you can do it in high gear, but it's easier on your components to run in the lower gear when you can.
 

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A note to add here...your wet clutch will thank you for running in low gear when you are at lower speeds. The wet clutch operates based off centrifugal force to push the shoes into the drum to start your primary sheave turning. So since centrifugal force increases with RPM, that means the higher the engine rpm the more force is applied from shoe to drum. You want more force, because it means less slipping. When you are in low gear, this lets your engine RPM run a little higher, which helps to keep more pressure on the wet clutch shoes, and therein, less slippage. A very beneficial upgrade to help prevent clutch damage if you decide in the future to run larger tires, would be a slug kit. Watch this video; Todd explains what happened to the clutch shoes from running large tires and using high gear all the time.

 

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99% of the time I am in low. High for open roads only.
 

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After my Hunterworks Monster sheave, titanium spring and Detroit locker Wet Clutch, I climbed to the top of Mount Everest pulling 35" BFG's, two stuck Razors, 12 climbers and a pack mule, all in high gear! :cool: - lol
Pics? :p I know, the heavy clouds and tornado passing by ruined the backdrop!
 
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