Yamaha Wolverine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Not trying to start another big thing here, but this is the first vehicle I've ever had with a CVT so I'm a complete newbie. What is the difference between a kit like the one listed here and the full sheave/spring/slug setup? For now, I'm not planning on changing anything because there I'm happy with the performance and there are other areas I want to make additions to mine, but I may get to feeling froggy down the road.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kirk57

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Really not to interested in getting a machined sheave kit. From reading on other forums, many say the clutch lit is the way to go.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
878 Posts
10 dollar shim in mine and notice quite a difference in the bottom end,i lost about 4mph on the top end
How much shim did you put in it?

With no brakes, coasting, going down a somewhat of a steep hill what mph. would the wet clutch hold you back at?

Then what was the mph. in the same scenario after the shim?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I learned my lessons with the Rhino I had, so speaking from that experience, there is absolutely nothing wrong with going with the clutch kit my buddy did that to start on the Rhino. Worst part about that is you get to work with a nice greasy clutch and and taking it a part and putting it back together. Neither of us liked that job too much as it was just too damn messy to do over a beer. For mine I ended up just buying a brand new OEM sheave and cam plate and used the Hunterworks OD weights. In the end we were both comparable (at least we collectively thought and both of us had 27 inch XTR's) and mine was a simple rip and replace and we hardly even dirtied ourselves. So when I get around to doing the Wolverine I will do similar to what I did before and buy the Hunterworks sheave kit and a new cam plate, take the original sheave off and put in a box (with the grease still in it) and put the brand spanking new greaseless one on. For me I just love the cleanliness and ease of using no grease and that clutch kit will have you digging in.

Thats my 2 cents from personal experience. That slug kit looks to be a fair bit more work knowing myself I may be more inclined to buy that clutch assembly pre-slugged to save myself the grief of trying to find those clips after I lose them flying across the garage.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Nice write up Wiggidy. Don't be afraid of those clips. They are really really simple to get off and on. Not like some snap rings on axle carriers bearings I've had to replace on a quad. Holy crap.. those are a nightmare.

IMG_20150701_195247_275.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
How much shim did you put in it?

With no brakes, coasting, going down a somewhat of a steep hill what mph. would the wet clutch hold you back at?

Then what was the mph. in the same scenario after the shim?

Thanks.
the mechanic said he put a 1.20 shim in,i never really checked the speed,but notice a difference going down hill,what I like is even with two people and a couple hundred pounds in the back you can crawl over obstacles with ease.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
771 Posts
Really not to interested in getting a machined sheave kit. From reading on other forums, many say the clutch lit is the way to go.
NOthing wrong with a good clutch kit for sure, you may not need or want the sheave,

NOt a fan of EPI and the little springs in the kit are for the wet clutch, that is a very old way of doing things, now just the opposite is the way to go, by weighting the shoes in the wet clutch to make it engage sooner not later like the spring do

Feel free to call me and I will discuss it all with you and I promise I will give everyway of doing it a fair explanation

Todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is the difference between a clutch kit and a Wet Clutch Slug kit? From reading they seem to do the same?
 

·
November WOTM Winner!
Joined
·
882 Posts
I learned my lessons with the Rhino I had, so speaking from that experience, there is absolutely nothing wrong with going with the clutch kit my buddy did that to start on the Rhino. Worst part about that is you get to work with a nice greasy clutch and and taking it a part and putting it back together. Neither of us liked that job too much as it was just too damn messy to do over a beer. For mine I ended up just buying a brand new OEM sheave and cam plate and used the Hunterworks OD weights. In the end we were both comparable (at least we collectively thought and both of us had 27 inch XTR's) and mine was a simple rip and replace and we hardly even dirtied ourselves. So when I get around to doing the Wolverine I will do similar to what I did before and buy the Hunterworks sheave kit and a new cam plate, take the original sheave off and put in a box (with the grease still in it) and put the brand spanking new greaseless one on. For me I just love the cleanliness and ease of using no grease and that clutch kit will have you digging in.

Thats my 2 cents from personal experience. That slug kit looks to be a fair bit more work knowing myself I may be more inclined to buy that clutch assembly pre-slugged to save myself the grief of trying to find those clips after I lose them flying across the garage.
Was just looking and for the price of the cam plate I can't say I would even mess with using the original
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
What is the difference between a clutch kit and a Wet Clutch Slug kit? From reading they seem to do the same?
The EPI clutch kit that you linked to contains pieces to all parts of the clutching system secondary, primary and wet clutch. So basically you will have to touch and modify in all 3 of those areas. The wet clutch is in behind (internally so to speak) the primary sheave. Best advice I can give is to watch a few of the Hunterworks videos, you'll have a pretty good understanding of everything clutch wise after you view them. Nothing like a good youtube course, I dug up a few of them for you.

Polaris RZR XP 900, Polaris Ranger 800 - Wolverine Sheave Install
Polaris RZR XP 900, Polaris Ranger 800 - Rhino Secondary
Polaris RZR XP 900, Polaris Ranger 800 - Wet Clutch Install Video

Was just looking and for the price of the cam plate I can't say I would even mess with using the original
Yup, once you go greaseless you never go back, that cam plate is so inexpensive that I am afraid to get grease on my hands. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If grease less is so great why is Yamaha still using the wet clutch? This was one of the features I read about the yamaha belt clutch system that is was very dependable. Over on the RZR forum seems all they do is replace belts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
The greaseless is just for the primary sheave, instead of using grease for the roller weights that sit under the cam plate. the wet clutch assembly is still and remains wet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
If grease less is so great why is Yamaha still using the wet clutch? This was one of the features I read about the yamaha belt clutch system that is was very dependable. Over on the RZR forum seems all they do is replace belts.
A wet clutch and a sheave are 2 entirely different things.
There was a post on here awhile back, from a moderator of that other forum, claiming he slugged his sheave, after only 1 mile. Lol
You may not want to take too much advice from him.
 

·
Engineer
Joined
·
1,807 Posts
The EPI kit allows the wet clutch to slip until higher rpms where it engages in order to develop higher torque before take off. The downside is that this tends to wear the wet clutch out faster. A better setup is to lock the wet clutch up sooner, at lower rpm and tune your CVT to rev the engine for higher torque transfer. Therefore, adding wet clutch slugs adds weight to each of the individual wet-clutch shoes allowing them to grab at lower rpm. While modifying the sheave will certainly help with low end torque, you could also just add 18gram weights to your OEM setup. This would give you a little higher torque curve without adding a modified sheave. Hunterworks always answer the phone or email.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
771 Posts
What is the difference between a clutch kit and a Wet Clutch Slug kit? From reading they seem to do the same?
Clutch kit is roller weights that weigh differently than your stock ones and spring for the secondary that is different than your stock on, changes the rate of shift out normally better

Wet clutch slug kit is basically weights that go in your wet clutch that make it engage sooner and more clamping force.

You have two clutches guess you could say three really, there is a wet clutch in the engine that allows you to sit at idle in gear and not move. If you ever seen a centrifugal clutch on a chainsaw or go kart it works like that and looks similar to that. Give it gas it engages then it starts turning the primary sheave where the weights are, that in turn with the belt turns the secondary clutch on the transmission.

Feel free to call me today

Todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Todd,

I found your web site to be very informative. Fact is everything I wanted to know is shown on your pages. As with your many video's. Very well done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
As alluded to, the wet clutch springs are "stall springs". They hold your wet clutch blocks/shoes in longer; i.e., you run more rpm before the wet clutch grabs. It's akin to revving an engine and dumping the clutch in a standard transmission vehicle. The HUGE downside is it wears your wet clutch faster. They're older tech than slugs, which were developed, at least in brass slug form, by KMS for the higher hp motors people started putting in rhinos and quickly burning their wet clutch. Some people melt lead and pour into the holes instead of buying slugs. The slugs do pretty much the opposite of what the stall springs do. With slugs, you're closer to a direct drive because the clutch grabs at a lower rpm. The HUGE advantage of the slugs is that they greatly increase the lifespan of the wet clutch. There are other advantages as well when using the machine for towing or probably most general riding. With just the slugs you're not going to notice much of a "performance" type gain but you get longevity and other benefits. The stall springs might feel like a boost because but like regularly dumping the clutch in a standard transmission where you would be replacing your clutch soon, your very expensive clutch carrier will not last nearly as long either. And you wouldn't want to run both as they would pretty much cancel one another out.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top