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I'm getting ready to service clutch sheaves, the last time I serviced them I used Tink Seal. My question is, how do you clean the clutch sheaves after previously servicing them with Tink Seal. I was going to get a parts washer to clean the rollers, roller cavities (running grease), grease seal races, and inside of sheaves but I'm afraid I might inadvertantly subject the sheave faces to Tink Seal. I thought I could give the sheaves a good cleaning with a parts cleaner but now I'm having second thoughts. It recycles the cleaning fluid and I'm thinking it might subject the sheave faces to Tink Seal. I believe Tinken said Tink Seal can't be removed with brake cleaner because it embeds into the metal. Using Tink Seal is a great idea but it is not grease and can't be treated and possibly cleaned the same way. Any info would be appreciated.
 

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In the past, popsickle sticks, old tooth brushes and lots of blue shop rags and time.
Desertdweller, suggested putting it in an old toaster oven till the grease melted and pouring it out. That was with OEM grease and I’m not sure that works with TS?

I haven’t done it yet but I’ve been pondering an idea for the next service for awhile. Maybe someone can try it before me.
After getting out the bulk of it with a popsicle stick, I plan to put a s plastic cover over the sheave face. They make those kind to put over pie plate or like a shower cap that are stretchy.
A zip tie or rubber band around it after for extra security. I want to find a rubber cap to slide over the hole for the collar. Haven’t measured it, but maybe a 2” rubber plumbing cap with a hose clamp on it. Then I’m going to find a way to put it in a large clamp in a vertical position and I’m just going to power wash it out. I’m imagining a clean quick service. No more reason to hate grease🤷‍♂️. We shall see!
 
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· Rock Crawler
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I'd just wipe out the excess, the tinkseal ingrained in the metal shouldn't hurt anything. My understanding is once it gets in there it helps the metal stay lubricated and keeps dirt from getting in the pores.
He is worried about the TS getting on the sheave face. The worry is that it may cause belt slip.
 

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If Tink Seal can penetrate metal, what makes us believe it won't penetrate tape or plastic? :unsure:
 

· Rock Crawler
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Correct but the the tinkseal is all on the backside so it should never get on the sheave face (put tape over the face like if worried about it getting there while wiping) when just wiping out the old stuff. I would not use any cleaner if tinkseal had been used. I'd just wipe it out.
I agree you need to cover the face. It’s a very difficult job to get the grease out without getting it all over your hands and not be touching the sheave face.
 
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What Budro said. Huge roll of paper towels, tape paper plates to your sheave faces. Wear gloves, change them often. When you put TS back in, just pack it around the sliders, no need to put it in on the weights or in the channels. The weights are constantly lubricated internally.
 

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So to get the regular grease out for the first service, could you use a parts washer and solvent? Would that hurt the sheave face? Not trying to sound dumb, only asking before I do it and mess something up.
 

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What Budro said. Huge roll of paper towels, tape paper plates to your sheave faces. Wear gloves, change them often. When you put TS back in, just pack it around the sliders, no need to put it in on the weights or in the channels. The weights are constantly lubricated internally.

Ok, I'm not trying to be mean, just found this in my reading.


Nice video. A couple of things I want to point out in your video: You do not have nearly enough grease in your sheave, you should have at least 3 ounces which would be about 75% of that TinkSeal tub. TinkSeal will become semi liquid once the clutch heats to operating temperature. I still prefer greaseless. However, if you are going to use TinkSeal, you will need enough to counter the dust you will be collecting in your sheave.

Depending on when you purchased your sliders from Weller Racing, you may already have generation 2 sliders. Camplate sliders should be inspected and replaced every 2000 miles at servicing. There is a little casting "Nub" on each of the camplate sliders. This "Nub" faces down. Those sliders may not be fully seated on the camplate, they are a really tight fit. You will need to gently push them in with something that that fits the inside snugly.

You may find it easier to grease your shafts instead of greasing the sheave collar. Keeps corrosion to a minimum.

View attachment 96627 View attachment 96628
Is it a small amount of TS, or load it up like the picture? No animosity, just trying to clarify for my own service.
 

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Is it a small amount of TS, or load it up like the picture? No animosity, just trying to clarify for my own service.
Good question. I only added an ounce and a half to my primary this weekend. After spinning up the RPM I could see it spread out over the outer sheave wall and looked okay to me.
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So to get the regular grease out for the first service, could you use a parts washer and solvent? Would that hurt the sheave face? Not trying to sound dumb, only asking before I do it and mess something up.
To make it easier, put tape on the face or tape something over it when cleaning the OEM grease out. Use something like painters tape that doesn't leave a strong adhesive residue.

My first comment was in response to using tinkseal because you won't need or use near as much of it compared to OEM grease. It also seems to be more pliable and should wipe out easier.
 

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Guys/Gals, many are over-thinking it.
Clean out the old with paper towels, rags or whatever.
Spray wash it with carb cleaner / break cleaner.
Scuff the face with scotch-brite, clean again with carb cleaner and re-lube.
It really is that simple.
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I would recommend giving the roller channels a light coat of tinkseal using a acid brush...link , especially if you are going to just pack the outer wall.
Because this coat helps to repel dust and keep it from accumulating
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Sheave Prep Coat Above
Used sheave inspection later below.
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If you are using TinkSeal with HV weights, you only need to pack the TS around the slider towers. The manual calls for 3.1oz. Your mileage will vary, add what you feel comfortable with.

View attachment 109001
I was hoping to go greaseless with the dust cover off for blow out purposes. Do I need to grease the sliders now? Very confusing...
 

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So to get the regular grease out for the first service, could you use a parts washer and solvent? Would that hurt the sheave face? Not trying to sound dumb, only asking before I do it and mess something up.
I don’t think I would do it.
Im not opposed to using brakeklean since your not recirculating it back on. I’ve used brakeklean in the past.
 
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