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I installed Big Horn Originals today on factory aluminum wheels (Yes Ugly). Took some measurements for others. Used digital bathroom scale, so take with grain of salt, but still representative. Hope helps

Original 2.0 on Factory Aluminum Wheels
Front 31LB Mounted Tire Only 19LB Width Mounted 7.5"
Rear 37LB Mounted Tire Only 25 LB Width Mounted 9.5"
Measured Diameter off vehicle mounted 24.75" to 25"

Replacement Original Big Horn
Front 26x9x12 37.5LB Mounted Tire Only 25LB Width Mounted 9"
Rear 26x12x 12 45lb Mounted Tire Only 33LB Width Mounted 12"
Measured Diameter off vehicle mounted 26.5" 26.75"

Gained almost 1" Ground Clearance

For Record all 4 new tires took about 4oz to balance (3.6 to 4.4 oz)

Have not driven yet so can not say if or how much power I lost with additional 28LB added rotating weight & bigger diameter

Sorry about the pictures but used cell phone rather than camera

#1.JPG #2.JPG #3.JPG #4.JPG #5.JPG
 

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Pictures look good. All my pictures are taken with my iphone.
 

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Thanks for the write up. I always wonder the difference in weights of different wheel/tire combo's.
 

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I like the alpine white wheels. These OG bighorns should come on this machine. The 2.0s have no business being on any side by side.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
keep in mind that the stock tires are 2-ply front and 4-ply rear and not radial. that is why so light
 

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The Big Horn 2.0 is a lightweight version that mimics the tread design of the original, with a slimmer profile. Radial construction provides better shock absorption, allowing for a smoother ride. The non-directional pattern provides predictable cornering and claws up roots and rocks, creating optimum climbing confidence. The Bighorn 2.0 boasts a 6-ply rating.
 

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The Big Horn 2.0 is a lightweight version that mimics the tread design of the original, with a slimmer profile. Radial construction provides better shock absorption, allowing for a smoother ride. The non-directional pattern provides predictable cornering and claws up roots and rocks, creating optimum climbing confidence. The Bighorn 2.0 boasts a 6-ply rating.
Absolutely. They are light, have a great tread pattern, ride and handle fantastic. My last 3 machines, Commander/Maverick/Wolverine, came with them. Its like any atv/vehicle. They put the best riding tire on the machine so it will demo well. I cant blame them for doing it. I think the 2.0 is a demo only tire :). My first experience with the 2.0s was in my Commander at Hatfield McCoy on the Rockhouse trail. Day, 1 I had punctured and plugged 3 of my 2.0s. Day 2, I emptied a can of fix-a-flat into 2 of the punctured tires and inflated them every stop. Day 3, I punctured tire 4 even though I had put an entire bottle of green slime in the last tire. So 3 days of riding, I ruined 4 tires. Next trip down there, I had the OG bighorns which did fine. I did have some separation where the white lettering meets the tire which could result in a leak. Now I run the Rocktanes.
 

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YOU ARE RIGHT...Just checked,factory tires are 2pr front&4pr rear.Will be replacing them very soon.Have not had any leaks or flats yet,but that is probably because they all have Quadboss tire sealant in them.Am concerned about sidewalls,probably paper thin.
 

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You loose 4% of your torque for every inch you increase your diameter.
Pretend this is grade school...show your work please..lol. I could understand this for the first inch, but it would not be linear would it? Also, that is only a calculation based on the distance from the center of the axle to the end of the "lever", or surface of the tire. In the real world, inertia and rotating mass would play a larger role than I think you have taken into consideration. Of course, I could be wrong, but hey, you didn't show your work lol. Sorry I normally play with wires and such, mechanical engineering is not my forte.
 

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Pretend this is grade school...show your work please..lol. I could understand this for the first inch, but it would not be linear would it? Also, that is only a calculation based on the distance from the center of the axle to the end of the "lever", or surface of the tire. In the real world, inertia and rotating mass would play a larger role than I think you have taken into consideration. Of course, I could be wrong, but hey, you didn't show your work lol. Sorry I normally play with wires and such, mechanical engineering is not my forte.
If you want to get technical, you never lose power. It just goes somewhere else :).
 

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Pretty simple really. 25" tire equals 100%. 1" equals 4% of 25.
Not linear but close until you get out of the range of tires you can use on a Wolverine.
Inertia and rotating mass is small potatoes compared to diameter or length of the lever.
Jack up you wolvy and put it in high range floor the throttle and notice how quickly the tires max out. That is the rotating mass. Now set it back down and put it in high and see how long it takes to max out.
Tire weight is more critical to handling than it is to acceleration unless you are worried about a few hundredths of a second at the starting line in a drag race.
 

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If you want to get technical, you never lose power. It just goes somewhere else :).
Well, duh lol. I realize that silly.

Pretty simple really. 25" tire equals 100%. 1" equals 4% of 25.
Not linear but close until you get out of the range of tires you can use on a Wolverine.
Inertia and rotating mass is small potatoes compared to diameter or length of the lever.
Jack up you wolvy and put it in high range floor the throttle and notice how quickly the tires max out. That is the rotating mass. Now set it back down and put it in high and see how long it takes to max out.
Tire weight is more critical to handling than it is to acceleration unless you are worried about a few hundredths of a second at the starting line in a drag race.
I had not thought of it that way, makes an interesting point.

I love this forum. Haha
So do I!

Some here may benefit from watching some Walter Lewin lecture video's.
OK-this is just plain creepy...I just started watching his pendulum one the other day on youtube lol. Never heard of the guy before, then all of the sudden I see this guy in the recommended videos and decided to click a video. He is very good at explaining things I must say, but how do you know of him?
 

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Oh, I've done a lot of MIT coursework. I've always been a physics enthusiast but went over to the computer side. Actually did literary rallies in physics during my school days in Louisiana.
 
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