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2021 X2 RSPEC 850
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m still a newbie to side by sides and dry sump motors but an old hand at farm equipment maintenance. A cursory check of local dealers revealed so much “diversity” in hours and cost that I figured to do all the services myself. As I was breaking the RSPEC in, I was on here reading and absorbing everyone’s wisdom. Long story short, I just spent 8 hours doing the first service and made a few observations along the way:
1. Use 6 sided sockets.
2. Invest in the 64mm oil filter cap wrench. I had one, it's the same size used on one of the Kubota oil filters.
3. Lay in a supply of panel retainers. They are cheap and easier to replace than save.
4. When loosening things for the first time, slow and steady saves the day. Do not channel King Kong.
5. If it has a torque value, use a torque wrench. The calibration equipment for my breakaway wrist was rendered obsolete decades ago. My 3/8” torque wrench does go below 10 ft lbs, so the one thing I had to buy was a ¼” in lb torque wrench for the oil tank drain and spark plugs.
6. When refilling the engine oil, the advice published on this forum is better than the owner’s manual. Install the engine cap before adding oil to the tank. Much has been said about the complexity of checking oil levels in Yamaha’s dry sump motors. I started with 2.6L and added in .2L increments, checking every time with engine at temp and not screwing the stick in. Stopped at 3.3L and still nothing on the stick. I’ll give it a good run and see where it’s at afterwards.
UPDATE: Had a good ride, checked the oil when I got back. Showed 2/3 on the hashmarks. All is well.
7. I opted to drain everything and then refill. Others may focus on one component at a time. Do what works for you. The air intake was sealed well and empty.
8. Refilling the differentials required some creativity using the bucket full of plastic bottles in the barn. For the front, I tie wrapped a length of clear sprayer tubing (same size as the fill opening) to a cap with a straight spout. That cap also fit a plastic squeeze bottle with a curved spout. I cut the tip off the spout to do the rear differential. Quick and clean.
9. I used OEM stuff.
10. Finish with all the tools you started with. I was short a flashlight but found it up under the skid plate where I’d placed it to illuminate the transmission drain.
11. I did reference the cheat sheets that I created and shared at the end of this post.

At the end of the day, I did everything a reputable shop would have done and more. It did take some time, but the quantum leap in familiarity was well worth it. Nothing compares to knowing something was done right because you did it yourself. If you are a new owner and have some trepidation about wrenching on your machine, set it aside and take the plunge. I would like to thank those who posted pertinent topics on this forum. It made everything go very smoothly.
 

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2021 Yamaha RMAX 2 XT-R 1000
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Awesome, sounds like you got it covered to a tee, and hit all the points. I just know no shop is going to take the time and care I use when doing mine. I use a large syringe and a container to fill my diffs, the bottle hoses and extensions just seem to make a bigger mess.
 
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I’m still a newbie to side by sides and dry sump motors but an old hand at farm equipment maintenance. A cursory check of local dealers revealed so much “diversity” in hours and cost that I figured to do all the services myself. As I was breaking the RSPEC in, I was on here reading and absorbing everyone’s wisdom. Long story short, I just spent 8 hours doing the first service and made a few observations along the way:
1. Use 6 sided sockets.
2. Invest in the 64mm oil filter cap wrench. I had one, it's the same size used on one of the Kubota oil filters.
3. Lay in a supply of panel retainers. They are cheap and easier to replace than save.
4. When loosening things for the first time, slow and steady saves the day. Do not channel King Kong.
5. If it has a torque value, use a torque wrench. The calibration equipment for my breakaway wrist was rendered obsolete decades ago. My 3/8” torque wrench does go below 10 ft lbs, so the one thing I had to buy was a ¼” in lb torque wrench for the oil tank drain and spark plugs.
6. When refilling the engine oil, the advice published on this forum is better than the owner’s manual. Install the engine cap before adding oil to the tank. Much has been said about the complexity of checking oil levels in Yamaha’s dry sump motors. I started with 2.6L and added in .2L increments, checking every time with engine at temp and not screwing the stick in. Stopped at 3.5L and still nothing on the stick. I’ll give it a good run and see where it’s at afterwards.
UPDATE: Had a good ride, checked the oil when I got back. Showed 2/3 on the hashmarks. All is well.
7. I opted to drain everything and then refill. Others may focus on one component at a time. Do what works for you. The air intake was sealed well and empty.
8. Refilling the differentials required some creativity using the bucket full of plastic bottles in the barn. For the front, I tie wrapped a length of clear sprayer tubing (same size as the fill opening) to a cap with a straight spout. That cap also fit a plastic squeeze bottle with a curved spout. I cut the tip off the spout to do the rear differential. Quick and clean.
9. I used OEM stuff.
10. Finish with all the tools you started with. I was short a flashlight but found it up under the skid plate where I’d placed it to illuminate the transmission drain.
11. I did reference the cheat sheets that I created and shared at the end of this post.

At the end of the day, I did everything a reputable shop would have done and more. It did take some time, but the quantum leap in familiarity was well worth it. Nothing compares to knowing something was done right because you did it yourself. If you are a new owner and have some trepidation about wrenching on your machine, set it aside and take the plunge. I would like to thank those who posted pertinent topics on this forum. It made everything go very smoothly.
Good job
***I second the torque wrench suggestion/I got one off Amazon & found I overtightened my oil drain 5Lbs,YIKS and thats aluminum case!!!
I got my oil filter off relatively easy by using a car oil wrench and slipped my hand through opening between rear wheel and frame(didn’t require removing suggested panel).
Note the opening underneath oil filter is just a tiny bit too small to drop out oil filter so I put my finger in the filter threads and slipped it out side.New filter replaced same way.
 

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2017 Wolverine SE
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Very interesting, I see you put in the correct volume of oil by measuring it going in. Normally there are two volume with/without the oil filter change. On mine at least, as the filter is every 2nd change but require a modest amount of oil extra. I'd expect the correct procedure to result in closer to full than 2/3rds as monitoring for oil use during breakin and after is key to know how the engine is over time.

Maybe something different will give you a consistant full check if not consistent 2/3rds. The checking method make verifying oil consumption difficult IMO. I check mine 300 -400km unless I have a reason to do it sooner or find it very consistent may go longer.
 

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If you torque the diff plugs, that torque value is for new crush washers technically.
Since I don't change them, hand torque it is.
30yrs as a Millwright building turbines, I'm calibrated :p
 

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I agree if its tight bottomed out there is no intent on stripping the threads which does not make it tighter.
 
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If you torque the diff plugs, that torque value is for new crush washers technically.
Since I don't change them, hand torque it is.
30yrs as a Millwright building turbines, I'm calibrated :p
Afterwards I wondered about that since I used same washers.The Wolverine cost makes me question my arm torque calibration so I bought the torque wrench….man do I fear stripping out those little soft aluminum threads…now that front drain fill pulg is just weird being so much larger than others.NOT happy with Yamaha for having a size my tool box doesn’t have after I drain the oil,AARRGGHHH.
 

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2021 X2 RSPEC 850
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you torque the diff plugs, that torque value is for new crush washers technically.
I didn't mention it in the OP, but I did replace the washers for the first service, hence the torque step. Probably won't do it every time now, but they were cheap enough to go ahead the first time.

front drain fill pulg is just weird being so much larger than others
Yeah, it's weird. I checked sizes beforehand to make sure I had everything. A quick trip to a larger town that might have what I need takes two hours. I had a 6mm allen key to drain the front diff, but I didn't have one I could use with a torque wrench. Do now. Fortunately, my metric toolbox was pretty well stocked to service my Kubota stuff.
 
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