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Interesting belt temperature facts!

This is a discussion on Interesting belt temperature facts! within the CVT, Sheaves & Wet Clutch forums, part of the Yamaha Wolverine Gen 1 708 cc SxS category; Originally Posted by Tripplec it begs the question are we overly concerned about something that is well within operating parameters as it is. I’m not ...

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Thread: Interesting belt temperature facts!

  1. #11
    Speed Demon Budro2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tripplec View Post

    it begs the question are we overly concerned about something that is well within operating parameters as it is.
    I’m not trying to push this on anyone else! It’s a great CVT and I’m sure that stock you’ll never have one issue.
    I am not stock at all and I do get real belt heat that is to high from time to time trying to use it to suit my needs!
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    Seems if you are going to put motor on exhaust side with a duct extension, you could do a gravity blower door type outlet upstream of fan like a typical dryer outlet. So that if the internal flow is drawing by fan it will keep the door shut, but if the positive CVT fan CFM overpowers the negative CFM of the electrical fan, it opens to blow out and relieve the pressure and allow the additional flow.
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  3. #13
    Super Moderator Rockit401's Avatar
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    A blower is more efficient mounted in the intake, or cooler side because the air expands a lot as it heats up.
    So, mounted in the cool side you can add quite a percentage to the total exhaust air flow and mounted in the hot side you would subtract from the total intake air flow.
    Plus the fan will be running in cooler air which will make it last longer.
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  5. #14
    Speed Demon Budro2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimclemjr View Post
    Seems if you are going to put motor on exhaust side with a duct extension, you could do a gravity blower door type outlet upstream of fan like a typical dryer outlet. So that if the internal flow is drawing by fan it will keep the door shut, but if the positive CVT fan CFM overpowers the negative CFM of the electrical fan, it opens to blow out and relieve the pressure and allow the additional flow.
    I’ve watched many an install video or looked at pic tutorials with various RZR blowhole installs and they don’t make to much out of it. There all designed as plug and play. Some require no cutting of ducting and others require removing only an inch or two of ducting to fit in. The major issue in the past I believe was that bilge pump fans didn’t push as much air as the CVT needed at high speed so with Duners for example it was counter productive. They have calibrated that so it’s getting as much as the required amount of air at high speeds and now they work for fast or slow driving. As far as slow goes if it’s pushing or pulling more air than it would without it, all that means is even lower temps than stock. As of now there is one that I think will plug right onto the exhaust duct off the cover and then just attach the rubber elbow back on it. No cutting or modification. There are a couple others that could be placed into the short strait section of the exhaust ducting by just cutting out a small piece. If it doesn’t work that piece of exhaust duct can’t cost very much! I’m going to try and keep it real simple like all the RZR installs! I’m going to call MTNTK (blowhole manufacture) tomorrow and explain what I’m doing and get educated and see what they suggest. Ive read they are very helpful!
    Last edited by Budro2; 12-29-2019 at 07:02 PM.
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    Speed Demon Budro2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockit401 View Post
    A blower is more efficient mounted in the intake, or cooler side because the air expands a lot as it heats up.
    So, mounted in the cool side you can add quite a percentage to the total exhaust air flow and mounted in the hot side you would subtract from the total intake air flow.
    Plus the fan will be running in cooler air which will make it last longer.
    So..... if I’m forced to use it on the exhaust side I’d be better off with all the CFM I can get? Not sure there is a viable simple option of putting it on the intake side. Hunterworks site says they use many on the exhaust side on the RZRs!
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    Super Moderator Rockit401's Avatar
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    Yes, many on the exhaust but that is because of the simpler mounting. Hunterworks is just the middle man. He doesn't engineer or manufacture the fans so he just passes on whatever the manufacturer tells him. The desirability of the cooler side mounting was pointed out to him by a few members on another forum and that was his response. Apparently they work fine on the hot side but it is just not the best set up.
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    Speed Demon Budro2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockit401 View Post
    Yes, many on the exhaust but that is because of the simpler mounting. Hunterworks is just the middle man. He doesn't engineer or manufacture the fans so he just passes on whatever the manufacturer tells him. The desirability of the cooler side mounting was pointed out to him by a few members on another forum and that was his response. Apparently they work fine on the hot side but it is just not the best set up.
    I’ll take a closer look at the intake side to see if something can be done! Thanks for the insight!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Budro2 View Post
    What I can tell you is that for general driving, low speed, high speed, 3-6” snow, short uphill sections down hill..... there is virtually no difference in temps between low and high. The only difference you notice is how hard the engine is working so obviously very steep or long grades or deep snow low makes sense.
    Thanks for that information, I used to run in LOW a lot more, but have recently started using HIGH gear more often. I hate stopping to shift from LOW to HIGH when I get to faster section of trail... and it's even worse when you don't shift and the engine is SCREAMING in LOW, and you're only doing like 40km/h. Also, I think better gas mileage!
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    My Gen 1 is stock with over 6000 mi. The belt still looks great on inspection.
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  11. #20
    Speed Demon Budro2's Avatar
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    After talking to MTNTK Performance, just as Rockit401 stated, the blower works better on the intake side. They have tried to convert all of there blowholes over to the intake side that are possible! They have had many more warranty claims on the ones that go on the exhaust side. Also, they said if you ever do blow a belt then the fan can pull the belt debris in and it destroys the fan. They do have pretty inexpensive replacement fans available!
    I ordered one up after talking to them about the actual size and measuring and studying the ducting. The intake splits and air is pulled to the back side of the primary and the front side of the secondary. The secondary side seemed to be the best place to fit it in. It also seemed like the most direct path of cool air to the belt itself. The exhaust side looked the easiest but after receiving the blow hole I found that it’s OD and the OD of the flange coming off the exhaust CVT cover were the same diameter and it wasn’t going to slip in as I originally thought. As it turns out, the intake going to the secondary side is where it’s very thin and there has been an issue with it crushing. With a small amount of help from a heat gun, it’s a stretch to fit situation and it went right in, so it actually solves a second problem, where people were gluing something inside of it, to prevent the crushing when you tighten the clamp!
    I have it all installed and did a short test this afternoon but not under high load circumstances. I already know that it was worth the trouble. With the fan running and the engine off I can feel a decent amount of air being forced out the exhaust duct. After getting the belt up to operating temperature I found when I slowed to a stop the belt temperature went up 2-4 degrees as I was coming to a stop but as soon as movement ceased it began to steadily drop. Previously when I stopped it went up 10-15 degrees and then after a long period of time, would slowly go down. Worst case scenario, if I still get to much heat in a high load situation I can just stop and sit a bit and it should immediately start to go down, instead of putting it in neutral and revving my engine for long periods of time. When doing this, air flow is created and belt cooling happens, however belt heat is being created at the same time through friction, so for instance if I’m at 200 degrees and I’m in neutral spinning the sheaves till I reach 180, as soon as I stop it jumps to 190. By having the air circulation without the belt turning the temps come down quicker and when a safe temperature is reached, it's not going to spike back up a bit, before I can put it in gear and go! I’m fairly certain that it’s going to manage my heat issues without a lot of stopping in those situations, but..... more testing to come.
    I assumed that because the intake splits, putting the fan in one side wouldn’t restrict air at higher speeds or WOT because air can still be pulled through to the primary side and that way, is the path of least resistance. I believe I may have confirmed this today. At 20 MPH on flat ground with the temperature maintaining a constant I could get on it and around 30 MPH it would begin to go down 3-5 degrees. I believe this is because the CVT is still doing its job pulling more air as RPMs go up and proving that the installation of the blow hole is not acting as a restriction so long as it’s running. I can’t test that with it off because I wired it up, as suggested, so it’s running if the key is on, all the time! I suppose I could unplug it, to see how well it still cools, with it off and blocking flow but my intention is to run it all times!
    I took some pics of things along the way so if any bigger tire guys or people with snorkels are interested, I’ll do a HOW TO write up on what I used and how the installation went in the future!
    Last edited by Budro2; 01-07-2020 at 09:22 PM.
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